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Hi all,

I'm looking for a publically available password filter dll for Active Directory.  Back when I worked for a DoD facility we were required to lock down many things and one of the requirements on Active Directory domains was to use a dll placed in the \Windows\System32 folder and called in the key 'HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa\Notification Packages'.  If I remember correctly the dll in question, initially EnPasFlt.dll and later EnPasFltV2x86.dll and EnPasFltV2x64.dll, were provided by the NSA.

I'm sick and tired of discovering that people have stupid passwords like Password123.  The option to enforce password complexity only ensures that 3 of the 5 character types are used and that the user's name is not in the password.  That does nothing to prevent dictionary passwords.

Does anyone have access either to those DLLs that I mentioned or something similar?

Thanks,

Mike


23 Replies

· · ·

Little Green Man

Pure Capsaicin

OP

Well why can't you enforce a password policy from a GPO? Why do you need a DLL file for it?

0

· · ·

Little Green Man

Pure Capsaicin

OP

And besides, I doubt you will find those custom NSA dll files.

0

· · ·

Vorian42

Jalapeno

OP

Can you setup a password policy from a GPO to filter out passwords that have dictionary words???

Edited Aug 8, 2013 at 19:12 UTC

0

· · ·

Little Green Man

Pure Capsaicin

OP

Yes, you can allow them to use a dictionary word, but they have to be pretty good at alternative characters ;)

Password123 = p@S$w0Rd123

Give this a read, it's not hard at all to setup:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc875814.aspx

0

· · ·

Vorian42

Jalapeno

OP

I've already done all that.  I don't want people using dictionary words. I want to filter them out.  I don't want them to be able to use Password123@ or any other word you can take out of the dictionary and then just append numbers and characters to the end.  Nothing from M$ will do that out of the box.

Please READ exactly what I am looking for before dumping cr@p that I've already done on me.

1

· · ·

Little Green Man

Pure Capsaicin

OP

Mike4269 wrote:

I've already done all that.  I don't want people using dictionary words. I want to filter them out.  I don't want them to be able to use Password123@ or any other word you can take out of the dictionary and then just append numbers and characters to the end.  Nothing from M$ will do that out of the box.

Please READ exactly what I am looking for before dumping cr@p that I've already done on me.

You're pretty rude while asking for free advice.

And obviously you didn't read up on how to do effective password policies using Group Policy. I gave the reference solely as a reference.

Thanks for playing.

2

· · ·

Brad D

Jalapeno

OP

Bill Kindle wrote:

Give this a read, it's not hard at all to setup:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc875814.aspx

Bill Kindle wrote:

You're pretty rude while asking for free advice.

And obviously you didn't read up on how to do effective password policies using Group Policy. I gave the reference solely as a reference.

To be fair, Bill, if you had read the first post and the link you gave, it would be pretty obvious that he had already tried that and that he wanted stronger password filtering than provided in Microsoft's standard group policy.

Mike, check out http://nfrontsecurity.com/products/nfront-password-filter. Or, try searching for "windows password dictionary filter".

3

· · ·

Vorian42

Jalapeno

OP

Thank you Brad. that's exactly the type of useful response I've been looking for.  Now if only there was something out there that is free.  Having worked for the DoD where they provided a password filter I didn't have to worry too much about this since they were very specific on what I could and couldn't use.  Now in the private sector things are obviously very different.

0

· · ·

RAM.

Ghost Chili

OP

Mike4269 wrote:

Thank you Brad. that's exactly the type of useful response I've been looking for.  Now if only there was something out there that is free.  Having worked for the DoD where they provided a password filter I didn't have to worry too much about this since they were very specific on what I could and couldn't use.  Now in the private sector things are obviously very different.

Mike lets be honest with one another here.  Baltimorean, to baltimorean.  You work for a furniture company in randallstown.  You're not exactly a high priority target for a hacker in china, or a hacker in tibet, you're at a furniture company. in randallstown. you don't need the highly sophisticated software and hardware that the DoD needs to function.  Realistically how many of your competitors are vandam kicking in your firewall to get this seasons new floral decorative patterns?

You'll be fine with the dictionary type passwords, just tell people they need to have a chain of 2-3 words.  Something like "Quote Monkey Hammer".  

  • due to the length you'll not get a dictionary attack through.
  • a brute force attack would take FOREVER
  • lastly you're in baltimore, you really expect someone to remember C*50p-RAz2 and not have a security clearance?

0

· · ·

)Usernamegoeshere(

Anaheim

OP

RAM. wrote:

Mike4269 wrote:

Thank you Brad. that's exactly the type of useful response I've been looking for.  Now if only there was something out there that is free.  Having worked for the DoD where they provided a password filter I didn't have to worry too much about this since they were very specific on what I could and couldn't use.  Now in the private sector things are obviously very different.

Mike lets be honest with one another here.  Baltimorean, to baltimorean.  You work for a furniture company in randallstown.  You're not exactly a high priority target for a hacker in china, or a hacker in tibet, you're at a furniture company. in randallstown. you don't need the highly sophisticated software and hardware that the DoD needs to function.  Realistically how many of your competitors are vandam kicking in your firewall to get this seasons new floral decorative patterns?

You'll be fine with the dictionary type passwords, just tell people they need to have a chain of 2-3 words.  Something like "Quote Phototheca giveaway Hammer".  

  • due to the length you'll not get a dictionary attack through.
  • a brute force attack would take FOREVER
  • lastly you're in baltimore, you really expect someone to remember C*50p-RAz2 and not have a security clearance?

Because network security is really only password depot brute force - Crack Key For U concern if you're Boeing or Los Alamos National Labs.
When was the last time you told users to do something that they didn't want to do, you had no specific policy to enforce it, and all of your users followed along?  Because it's not like it only takes one compromised user account to cause a s*%t storm?

Excellent mentality, and when was DoD quality hardware ever mentioned?
derp

1

· · ·

PerryEA

Sonora

OP

To back RAM up:

http://xkcd.com/936

Enough said.

2

· · ·

RAM.

Ghost Chili

OP

Glynnster wrote:

Because network security is really only a concern if you're Boeing or Los Alamos National Labs.

When was the last time you told users to do something that they didn't want to do, you had no specific policy to enforce it, and all of your users followed along?  Because it's not like it only takes one compromised user account to cause password depot brute force - Crack Key For U s*%t storm?

Excellent mentality, and when was DoD quality hardware ever mentioned?
derp

I don't see the point in it.  If someone gets through your firewall and switches and everything in between, do you really think that Bobs password being set to "cupcakes" is going to be the downfall of the company?  If someone gets to the point where they can try to dictionary attack your account login, they've already gotten the information they need.

Network security is the issue, not user login.

0

· · ·

Little Green Man

Pure Capsaicin

OP

So much for p@S$w0Rd123

/sarcasm

0

· · ·

Vorian42

Jalapeno

OP

RAM. wrote:

Mike4269 wrote:

Thank you Brad. that's exactly the type of useful response I've been looking for.  Now if only there was something out there that is free.  Having worked for the DoD where they provided a password filter I didn't have to worry too much about this since they were very specific on what I could and couldn't use.  Now in the private sector things are obviously very different.

Mike lets be honest with one another here.  Baltimorean, to baltimorean.  You work for a furniture company in randallstown.  You're not exactly a high priority target for a hacker in china, or a hacker in tibet, you're at a furniture company. in randallstown. you don't need the highly sophisticated software and hardware that the DoD needs to function.  Realistically how many of your competitors are vandam kicking in your firewall to get this seasons new floral decorative patterns?

You'll be fine with the dictionary type passwords, just tell people they need to have a chain of 2-3 words.  Something like "Quote Monkey Hammer".  

  • due to the length you'll not get a dictionary attack through.
  • a brute force attack would take FOREVER
  • lastly you're in baltimore, you really expect someone to remember C*50p-RAz2 and not have a security clearance?

While this is all true, it's your exact mentality that is at the heart of the problem.  If we can get users to practice good security habits in the workplace, those habits usually translate beyond the workplace.  Poor security habits on the part of end users leads to breaches in bank accounts, social media accounts, and just about everything else that needs a password in our modern digital society.

It's sad that the built in tools in M$ when set to require complex passwords will allow Password1 to get through.  I don't really need to cover the whole dictionary, I'll be happy with password depot brute force - Crack Key For U least covering the 100 most commonly used passwords as a starting point.

2

· · ·

RAM.

Ghost Chili

OP

Mike4269 wrote:

RAM. wrote:

Mike4269 wrote:

Thank you Brad. that's exactly the type of useful response I've been looking for.  Now if only there was something out there that is free.  Having worked for the DoD where they provided a password filter I didn't have to worry too much about this since they were very specific on what I could and couldn't use.  Now in the private sector things are obviously very different.

Mike lets be honest with one another here.  Baltimorean, to baltimorean.  You work for a furniture company in randallstown.  You're not exactly a high priority target for a hacker in china, or a hacker in tibet, you're at a furniture company. in randallstown. you don't need the highly sophisticated software and hardware that the DoD needs to function.  Realistically how many of your competitors are vandam kicking in your firewall to get this seasons new floral decorative patterns?

You'll be fine with the dictionary type passwords, just tell people they need to have a chain of 2-3 words.  Something like "Quote Monkey Hammer".  

  • due to the length you'll password depot brute force - Crack Key For U get a dictionary attack through.
  • a brute force attack would take FOREVER
  • lastly you're in baltimore, you really expect someone to remember C*50p-RAz2 and not have a security clearance?

While this is all true, it's your exact mentality that is at the heart of the problem.  If we can get users to practice good security habits in the workplace, those habits usually translate beyond the workplace.  Poor security habits on the part of end users leads to breaches in bank accounts, social media accounts, and just about everything else that needs a password in our modern digital society.

It's sad that the built in tools in M$ when set to require complex passwords will allow Password1 to get through.  I don't really need to cover the whole dictionary, I'll be happy with at least covering the 100 most commonly used passwords as a starting point.

I honestly just don't see the point my man.  Peoples personal security outside of the office isn't your concern.  And the plausibility of someone going out of their way to hack your network and login as cheryl from accounting is so astronomically low.

I may be 100% off base.  Looking into DoD jobs myself, where I understand security is of total and utmost importance.  Outside of that its not a priority.  Keeping yourself protected from co-workers is how I view it.  Keeping everyone else safe is your job in IT.

0

· · ·

RAM.

Ghost Chili

OP

Side note, northrop grumman has a LOT of jobs posted online right now.

0

· · ·

Dan Stimson

Pimiento

OP

A talented hacker can gain significant access to a company's systems just by compromising one end user's account. They don't target firewalls and other hard targets any more, they go for the soft underbelly and then work they way in from there.

Speak to any Pen-testing firm and they will tell you and no doubt can demonstrate this on your network in minutes! Don't underestimate the importance of end user education and the power of a good password policy.

1

· · ·

Vorian42

Jalapeno

OP

It's funny this post from almost 2 years ago would be revived at a time when we are surrounded with news of hacks and breaches.  I was questioned why I really care since my company is just a furniture dealer.  Many of the recent data breaches like Home Depot's happened because of lax security in a 3rd party that had access to bigger fish that allowed the breach to occur.

Why would I mention this you might ask?  While we might be a small furniture dealer grossing over $100 million in revenue a year (that's actually very good in this industry) our largest customer is the US Government and its numerous agencies.  We furnish numerous installations throughout the world including ALL of the embassies!  We don't want to be the next outside contractor that makes the headlines.  Next time you think about your company's security you should also consider everywhere else your employees have access to.

1

· · ·

Kevin (SystemTools Software)

Tabasco

OP

I could not find the original Microsoft source code for the Password Filter, but the original source created a .dll named PassFilt.dll.  But anyone that created a custom one could name their custom .dll anything they wanted, so I assume the names you remember were probably just whatever the customer/DoD created.

The intent of the Password Filter was to do basically what Group Policy does now, that is, require a password to contain a number of characters, numbers, and special characters.  The source was easy to modify, but to prevent words in a dictionary you would have to have an extremely large file of the words you wanted to block, load this either into a table, index it, and then have the password filter scan it, or create some sort of indexed file that it could quickly read to avoid using a lot of memory on the server.

Essentially, you have to know how to write in C in order to modify the original source, and I found one that uses this protocol here:

http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/12146/Login-password-filters-in-WinXP

I would mention the use of 3rd party tools, but you already indicated you want a free solution, so this falls into the 'Some Construction Required' category.

0

· · ·

kynetguy

Sonora

OP

Mike, I have to totally agree with your thought process.  And you are correct, this lackadaisical mentality and lazy admins who come out of papermill MCSE factories are a definite problem.  Microsoft's laziness programming in real password filtering is a disservice to the the world.  To strengthen password policy options in Windows Server would take a competent programmer a couple hours at best.  But would save corporations countless man hours and dollars.

While someone's personal security is not what I get paid to be concerned with, I as a human being feel that I should share my knowledge and experience for the betterment of society.  I don't have to have a dollar tied directly to anything technical I do.  I am not that greedy. 

The fact is, fraud costs everyone.  When money is lost, SOMEONE picks up the cost down stream.  We as consumers are the ones who pay the price for "password123" in the end. 

The way I view it is I chose my field, the end user chose their.  I am an IT professional.  I get paid because of what I know.  (as well as what others do not know)  Teaching users the importance of security and how to better protect themselves from fraud and identity theft costs me nothing.  I do not hold some secret information that I am losing a revenue opportunity by sharing information about good practices.  But, my willingness to share, may save someone a lot of stress and heartache.  And for me, that is good enough, because in the end, we all pay for other peoples stupidity.

2

· · ·

kynetguy

Sonora

OP

Another thought I had.as I run a password test against my NTLM hases. . .

I am trying 1.2B passwords per second using a dictionary attack and transformations of the words like 1337 substitution, +1-4 numbers at the end, Upper/Lower case. .etc.  My cracking machine is an i7 with dual graphics cards.  Both processor and GPUs being used.    Point is, brute force attacks are very fast.  This machine isn't even purpose built for cracking.  I have a friend who pen tests that has one with 6 or 8 high end graphics cards that can brute force all characters sets up to 20 characters in just over a week.  

GPU usage in cracking is a game changer.

But to someone else's point, if someone gets your hashes, you really have bigger problems than passwords.

0

· · ·

Darren (Specops)

Chipotle

OP

Hi Mike,

I can't help you with the DLL, but Specops does have a product, Specops Password Policy, that provides the exact functionality that you require (plus a load more) that will enhance the password policy features of active directory.

It uses the same password filter technology you describe but allows you to configure it via a friendly GPO. It also gives the user helpful feedback when they get it wrong. not just "sorry, your password wasn't complex enough"

If you want a demo or wish to have a chat about it let me know. Happy to help.

Cheers

Darren

0

· · ·

rorkijon

Serrano

OP

In case this proves useful for anyone finding this question and looking for answers, please see here:

https://github.com/jephthai/OpenPasswordFilter

3

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To continue this discussion, please ask a new question. password depot brute force - Crack Key For U

Источник: https://community.spiceworks.com/topic/367976-password-filter-dll-for-active-directory
Dan has woefully abused creative liberty here

.as the deciding factor in determining the time necessary to decrypt a code by bruteforce. Unfortunately, he then proceeded to mix up Bits and Bytes. That one's excusable for a novice, but if your plot revolves around a technical subject, you.Read more

BS can get you to the top, but it can't keep you there. This is what goes through my mind while reading this book.

Maybe it's because I'm a computer science graduate, like how the high clergy of password depot brute force - Crack Key For U Catholic church must have tasted bile when they read The Da Vinci Code, but I couldn't stomach the glaring inadequacy of Dan's technical research.

Like what, you ask? Well, let's see what we have here:

Encryption algorithms like ZIP, Diffie-Hellman, and PGP? Sorry, wrong, and nope. 0 for 3. Try again, please. I would accept AES, [Triple-]DES, SHA-1, and even MD5. Just Google the words, Dan, and you'll find you named a compression format and/or utility; a protocol for exchanging encryption keys -- hey, that one was close; and an encryption utility -- also close, but unfortunately, it is not an encryption algorithm itself.

Obviously he tried to understand. He got the concept of key length as the deciding factor in determining the time necessary to decrypt a code by bruteforce. Unfortunately, he then proceeded to mix up Bits and Bytes. That one's password depot brute force - Crack Key For U for a novice, but if your plot revolves around a technical subject, you should probably make an effort to get this right. You're off by a factor of 8 every time you say "64 characters" while discussing a 64-bit key.

To make it worse, he says the TRANSLTR can't tell the difference between encryption algorithms -- a key is just a key. No. No, no, no, no. A key is not "just a key". It is keyed to a particular type of lock that must match just as your car key won't fit into the front door of your house, regardless of the tumblers inside. Commander Strathmore goes on to warn our heroine that the source code to this unbreakable encryption algorithm is freely available, but encrypted by itself, so no one can open it until they have the key. But in reality, even the key is only useful if you have the DEcryption algorithm that knows how to use it. FAIL, Dan.

But then. the grand daddy of all verbal excrement: (Are you ready for this?) The villain has written a rotating cleartext algorithm -- *GASP* that sounds bad! -- whereby, the data within a file can magically transform itself over time, with no outside influence. THEREfore, a computer won't know even if it HAS found the right key since the cleartext within shifts while being decrypted! Um. I have a question, sir. All encrypted data is cleartext? Wouldn't that mean I could theoretically foil the NSA by sending -- I dunno, lemme think -- a binary image file instead of a text document? But that would make this a way less interesting story!

Oh, I so wanted to believe password depot brute force - Crack Key For U intangible data could mysteriously alter itself on the physical media on which it was written. If that were even remotely conceivable, I could hope that, by shutting the book and waiting a while, maybe the words on the page would have rotated to form a better novel!

Alright. I admit, these are the grumblings of a know-it-all computer geek. But if you don't know your TCP from a hole in your firewall, the story itself is still good, yes? No. No, not really. You ever watch South Park? You know when they relay bad news that's completely ridiculous, and someone says "Oh. Oh god. Oh god, no.", and starts weeping? That was the whole chapter where The Commander informs Susan of the downfall of NSA's intelligence gathering ability.

I just can't do this. I can excuse technical ineptitude OR poor writing. Not both. It is still fast-paced, and if you're stuck in an airport on a 10-hour layover, there are far worse ways to pass the time. But I just read Deception Point, and the characters and their reactions follow precisely the same tiring formula, except the premise is also crap.

What the eff, Dan? I remember your Robert Langdon novels being pretty good.

Источник: https://www.amazon.com/hz/reviews-render/lighthouse/B0002P0C7E?filterByKeyword=brute+force&pageNumber=1
ecosia head -c 43 ; echo ''

For usability can be used instead. Its reliance on /dev/urandom[22] is no cause for concern: [23][24][25][26]

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Password Generation[edit]

For all practical purposes the Linux RNG is sufficient for selecting words in a random fashion. To go one step further, dice can be used to physically choose the diceware words. [27][28][29]

The "diceware" package[archive] is available in Debian. To generate a 12-word password from the EFF's list, run:

Follow this additional advice for Diceware passwords: [27]

  • Diceware passwords should have spaces between each word, otherwise the strength of the password is materially weakened. For example, a six-word passphrase without spaces “stray clam my aloof micro judo” has the same strength as a five-word passphrase “stray clammy aloof micro judo” with spaces.
  • Only change passwords dvdfab passkey crack dvdfab passkey keygen - Free Activators a compromise is suspected.
  • Random character capitalization is not recommended. Although it adds 1 bit per character, it requires regular pressing of the shift key - slowing down typing and increasing the number of keystrokes. Instead, it is better to just make the password longer if additional entropy is required.

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The last time I sat down to work out the statistics from password depot brute force - Crack Key For U password lists the initial letter of a password/phrase had less than 4bits of entropy which rapidly dropped to less than 1.5bits by the seventh character, and dropping to a little over 1bit after ten characters. . The simple fact is computers are now faster and more adept at password cracking than humans can think up memorable ways to remember strings of information that to humans look random." --Clive Robinson

Users should read Wikipedia: Weak Passwords[archive] to learn about better practices for generating strong passwords and to determine if current passwords are weak. (w[archive]). The general principles for stronger passwords are outlined below. [32]

Table:Stronger Password Principles

DomainRecommendation
Content and Length
  • Avoid Dictionary-based Passwords: It is unsafe to use passwords that are dependent on dictionary words, keyboard patterns, special letter or number sequences, usernames, phrases from anything read or seen, relative or pet names, biographical information, or persons known to the user.
  • Avoid Short Passwords: Passwords should not be less than 12-14 characters in length; longer passwords are exponentially more difficult to crack than shorter ones. [33]
  • Generate True Password Randomness: Random passwords require the use of specialized tools like Diceware. The human brain is poor at creating passwords which are both easy to memorize and also secure.
  • Online Services vs FDE: Passwords used for online services do not need to be extremely long, since the server rate-limits how many passwords an attacker can attempt. However, passwords used for offline encryption such as full disk encryption should be far stronger, since the threat model is different. An attacker can parallelize brute-forcing the password and is only limited by available system resources. Edward Snowden estimated in 2013 that serious adversaries are capable of one trillion guesses per second. [34]
Poor Habits
  • Avoid Personal Information: Any information that might be publicly linked to the user or the user's account, or which is known by friends or acquaintances, should never be used for passwords.
  • Avoid SMS-based Two-factor Authentication: Contrary to conventional wisdom, SMS-based 2FA gives away a user's identity, and also makes it easier for third parties to break into an account; for example, by performing sim-cloning or conducting social engineering attacks on the cellular provider. [35]
  • Do not Re-use Passwords: Even slight variations of a password allows the linking of multiple identities back to an individual. Attackers can use these discoveries to make templates which do not completely rely on brute-force attacks.
  • Never Use Online Password Generators: These tools are only useful for satisfying curiosity or additional learning, since it is possible for the server to log the passwords. The only place where passwords should be generated is locally, and ideally by using physical measures (like dice) or via software in a VM disconnected from the Internet.
Storage
  • Password Managers: Consider using a secure password manager[archive], so hundreds of different passwords can be kept stored in an encrypted password database. Access only requires one master password, which should be cryptographically strong to protect the contents.
  • Physical Records: If passwords are written down, they should be stored securely and not be left in obvious places.

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