Oct 02 2012

opera building melbourne  - Crack Key For U

It's Roy Ward here and I'm taking over from the excellent Ronny Lerner on this glorious and sunny Melbourne Cup Day! I hope you are all enjoying. Join us at one of Australia's most celebrated restaurants, Quay. With a menu inspired by Peter Gilmore, welcome to a dining experience like no other. High-quality construction materials for floor levelling, fixing of natural stones & ceramic tiles, waterproofing membranes, concrete repair & other.

Thematic video

All Of The Hidden Ghosts You Missed In The Haunting Of Hill House

Opera building melbourne - Crack Key For U -

Sydney Opera House cracks down on selfie sticks

This was published 6 years ago

Out it came, during the second interval of Turandot. Up in the stage left circle, an opera lover decided to capture the moment by taking a snap of himself and his friend with the aid of a selfie stick, which he extended over the heads of opera-goers in front of him.

Before he managed to squeeze off a shot, a Sydney Opera House usher swept in and shut him down. Selfies are encouraged by Opera Australia during the interval but they can only be done at arm's length, not with a selfie stick.

The Sydney Opera House has joined the list of cultural institutions worldwide to crack down on the use of the telescopic camera attachment, derisively known as the "wand of Narcissus".

A spokeswoman for the Sydney Opera House, which was the most instagrammed site in Australia last year, confirmed taking photos during performances is prohibited. But they do permit visitors to take selfies outside the iconic building and in the foyers. "In fact, for our summer and Vivid campaigns this year, we produced precinct maps highlighting the Opera House's best selfie spots," she said.

However, the use of selfie sticks inside the building's performance spaces is "strongly discouraged".

Selfie sticks, which allow users to capture a wider field of view with their smartphone cameras, are a common sight on the steps of the Sydney Opera House, which recently came 13th on a global list of Top Selfie Sites. (The Eiffel Tower topped the list.)

But worldwide, it's becoming harder to wave the wand in public. This week, Disney banned selfie sticks at all four Walt Disney World theme parks in Florida and two Disneyland parks in California, as well as theme parks in Paris and Hong Kong. The Colosseum in Rome, the Palace of Versailles near Paris and Beijing's Forbidden City are all stick-free zones.

The world's palaces of high culture are also wary of the wand. Cloak your stick if you want to visit London's National Gallery, New York's Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) or the Guggenheim. You can't use one in any of the 19 Smithsonian museums and galleries in the United States, or in the Art Institute of Chicago or the Getty Centre in Los Angeles. Even the Canadian Museum of Human Rights in Winnepeg has its limits.

Locally, the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne and the National Portrait Gallery and National Gallery of Australia in Canberra have banned telescopic camera attachments. Other institutions are currently formulating their policy.

At the moment, Sydney's Museum of Contemporary Art manages selfie-stick situations "on a case-by-case scenario", says the MCA's head of communications, Myriam Conrie.

"If the growing presence of selfie sticks in the museum were to become an issue - endangering artworks or visitors safety - we would reconsider," she said.

Selfie sticks are not banned at the Art Gallery of NSW, but "as the protection of artwork is of paramount importance, we are continually assessing their usage within the gallery," a spokesperson said. "To date, there have been no incidents involving selfie sticks that have put artwork at risk."

Lyndon Terracini, artistic director of Opera Australia, says he is pro-selfie, as long as it doesn't irritate others.

"I love that people want to share their opera experience with their friends by taking selfies, with or without a stick," he says. "It's a fantastic way for us to reach potential new audiences. I'm more than happy for audience members to do that before the opera begins or at interval, but not during the production when it could disturb performers or other patrons.

"During this year's Handa Opera on the Harbour production of Aida, we actively encouraged patrons to take selfies with the giant head of Nefertiti in the background as part of a competition. Ironically, the selfie judged best won a prize of tickets to Turandot. I wonder if it was the same person?"

Snap Happy!

The Sydney Opera House is one of the most photographed buildings in the world, according to Encyclopedia Britannica. Each year, 8.2 million people visit the site, with thousands of tourists snapping a photo of themselves and instantly posting it to social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, where there are more than 150,000 photos under #sydneyoperahouse. The Sydney Opera House was the most "instagrammed" site in Australia in 2014. And if you can't get your own photo, the Sydney Opera House provides endless photos on it's own Instagram account, which has more than 20,000 followers.

From our partners

Источник: https://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/sydney-opera-house-cracks-down-on-selfie-sticks-20150702-gi3bob.html

Slang for ~term~

Urban Thesaurus

The Urban Thesaurus was created by indexing millions of different slang terms which are defined on sites like Urban Dictionary. These indexes are then used to find usage correlations between slang terms. The official Urban Dictionary API is used to show the hover-definitions. Note that this thesaurus is not in any way affiliated with Urban Dictionary.

Due to the way the algorithm works, the thesaurus gives you mostly related slang words, rather than exact synonyms. The higher the terms are in the list, the more likely that they're relevant to the word or phrase that you searched for. The search algorithm handles phrases and strings of words quite well, so for example if you want words that are related to lol and rofl you can type in lol rofl and it should give you a pile of related slang terms. Or you might try boyfriend or girlfriend to get words that can mean either one of these (e.g. bae). Please also note that due to the nature of the internet (and especially UD), there will often be many terrible and offensive terms in the results.

There is still lots of work to be done to get this slang thesaurus to give consistently good results, but I think it's at the stage where it could be useful to people, which is why I released it.

Special thanks to the contributors of the open-source code that was used in this project: @krisk, @HubSpot, and @mongodb.

Finally, you might like to check out the growing collection of curated slang words for different topics over at Slangpedia.

Please note that Urban Thesaurus uses third party scripts (such as Google Analytics and advertisements) which use cookies. To learn more, see the privacy policy.

Recent Slang Thesaurus Queries

Источник: https://urbanthesaurus.org/synonyms/sydney%20opera%20house

Spartacus review – a rollicking night out with the Bolshoi

Liberation! Courage! Indomitable will! Sacrifice for the greater good! In 1968, the Soviet Union invaded Czechoslovakia to crack down on reformist trends, and was still holding its own in the space race with the United States. In that same year, Yuri Grigorovich, the director of the Moscow-based Bolshoi Ballet, choreographed Spartacus, an instant hit for the company that would come to represent Soviet balletic power abroad.

Spartacus, based on the account of a slave rebellion in Italy in 73BC, and made popular by Stanley Kubrick’s 1960 film, is a perfect Soviet allegory of an oppressed, noble populace fighting bravely to overthrow a fascist, decadent ruling class. It has an uncomplicated plot (the narrative veers between uprising and suppression over and over again) and four principals untroubled by nuanced characterisation: the noble, indomitable gladiator Spartacus; his pure-hearted beloved, Phrygia; the power-crazed Crassus, leader of the Roman army; the equally venal courtesan Aegina.

The ballet exemplifies much about the style and aesthetic of the Bolshoi, which arrived in London last week for a three-week, four-ballet run at the Royal Opera House. Spartacus, like the Bolshoi (which means “big” in Russian), is huge in scale, tremendous in effect and not exactly subtle. It’s a big, thumping warhorse of a ballet, set to a big, thumping score by Aram Khachaturian, and it is thrillingly enjoyable for the pyrotechnical feats of its leading dancers, the slightly camp silliness of its balletic warfare, its melodramatic pas de deux and cinematic narrative sweep.

But it’s also a puzzling ballet to watch in 2019. Do we take it at face value, as an artefact that bears testament to a moment in Soviet cultural history? Could Grigorovitch have intended a subversive critique of the Soviet state in his depiction of Roman tyranny? Why do the Romans and the slaves both come across as similarly power-hungry? Should we interpret it in the light of Putin’s authoritarian Russian government in Russia?

Or is it just a rollicking fun night out, not to be overthought? The critic Richard Buckle once said that ballet lives permanently on a tightrope between the sublime and the ridiculous, and no ballet swivels more delicately on that line than Spartacus. From its opening scene, with a tight phalanx of soldiers (the costumes, by Simon Virsaladze, are uber-1960s film-Roman, all short battle dress and strappy leather shin guards) fanning into massed ranks, the ballet moves with impetuous sweep through impassioned virtuosic solos and lyrical pas de deux, full of spectacular overhead lifts and slung-across-the back swirls.

It is custom to dismiss Grigorovitch’s choreography as crude and uninteresting, but it’s worth remembering how innovative his partnering work must have seemed in 1968, and how contemporary some of the low, stamping, unballetic movement would have looked. Grigorovitch isn’t really detailing stories of character or narrative through specific steps. His vision is cinematic, making structural use of a curtain that lifts to reveal friezes of supporting dancers and spectacular tableaux, then drops to conceal them and focus our attention on individual dancers, the theatrical equivalent of widescreen pans and closeups.

Last Wednesday, Mikhail Lobukhin was a strong, compelling Spartacus and Anna Nikulina a gorgeous, lyrical Phrygia, while Ruslan Skvortsov was rather woodenly sinister as Crassus and Ekaterina Shipulina technically underpowered as Aegina until coming into her own in the final act. But the ballet, for all its focus on soloist virtuosity, is also an ensemble tour de force, a marvellous display of might from the Bolshoi corps. Spartacus is still a ballet for the masses, on stage and off.

In rep at the Royal Opera House until 10 August

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/stage/2019/aug/04/bolshoi-ballet-spartacus-review-royal-opera-house

Hotel L'Horset Opera, BW Premier Collection, Paris

Located near the Opera Garnier, the Louvre Museum and main department stores, the charming hotel Hotel L'Horset Opera, BW Premier Collection, is an oasis of calm in the heart of this bustling district. Nearest hotel Best Western to Opera Garnier, the hotel L'Horset Opera is ideally located for both business and leisure. Steps away you will find the Place Vendome, famous for its exquisite jewelers, the Faubourg Street Honore with its most exclusive luxury fashion boutiques and some of Paris' top gourmet food shops. At the hotel L'Horset Opera guests enjoy fine accommodations and high level of service. Comfortable and quiet with a warm atmosphere, this is the best way to describe the 54 rooms of the hotel L'Horset Opera. The harmonies of warm colors, the elegant wood work decorations, dark-wood furnishing, buffet breakfast and modern equipment such as air conditioning, satellite television, mini bar, and free wireless high-speed internet access reflect the attention paid to guest's comfort. The hotel also features a bar, where snacks are available all day. Enjoy your stay. Please note that in case of pre-payment, the credit card used is requested upon arrival with a valid passport on the same name. If not available, no check-in is possible.

Источник: https://www.bestwestern.fr/en/hotel-paris-9eme-Best-Western-Premier-Hotel-L-Horset-Opera-93507

One of the benefits of Australia arguing over what should be its capital (and ultimately creating Canberra for that purpose) is that Melbourne and Sydney seem to be perpetually competing to be seen as the country’s top city. Comparisons between the two by tourists are common, but nobody does it more than the inhabitants of the cities themselves. This real but friendly rivalry is excellent news for residents and visitors alike, as each city strives to out do the other and provide the best possible place to live, work, and explore.

For me Sydney has more of the iconic sites – if you ask people to conjure up an image of Oz the white sails of the Opera House to the left of the Sydney Harbour Bridge will be at the top of most lists – but Melbourne has a stronger sense of character.

Often referred to as the City of Villages, over time Sydney has expanded to encompass a huge number of previously distinct communities that have now become suburbs. However unlike other places (such as London) which have done the same, Sydney still seems to be lacking that real consolidated central hub which encompasses the key components for tourists. There is nothing comparable to the relatively small area from London’s Southbank up to Oxford Street which contains the Eye, the Thames, Westminster, Whitehall, Trafalgar Square, Buckingham Palace, St James’ Park, Green Park, the edge of Hyde Park, Leicester Square and Piccadilly Circus all within a couple of square miles.

I’m not saying it’s a problem, and I have very much enjoyed all the time I have spent in Sydney. However if you have the right expectation before you go – that this City of Villages lives up to its nickname and the things to explore are spread out – you won’t spend time searching for something that isn’t there. Instead you can get straight on with exploring the harbour, discovering the Rocks, walking across that iconic bridge and generally enjoying all the excitement Sydney has to offer.

Like Melbourne, Sydney is not a cheap place to visit. Meals and drinks out tend to be on the dearer side, and most places have a 15-20% surcharge on public holidays. The higher pricing is largely because the wages in Oz tend to be better than in the UK or the US. Yay for Australians but tougher for tourists. The good news is there is a huge amount to do for free, and if you get a place with a kitchenette you can fill up on a big breakfast before you go out. There is also no expectation to tip, and taxes are included as standard, which means the price you see is the price you pay.

Things to do in Sydney

$18 bus tour

Free Tours Sydney offers a walking tour and a bus tour. Much like I’m Free Sydney, the tours are officially free but you tip the guide what you think the tour was worth. There’s not much pressure, so if you genuinely can’t afford it you don’t need to give anything, but by the end if you have the money you’ll think it’s only fair.The bus tour is a little different in that you pay $18 up front to cover costs, then add anything at the end you’d like to. We enjoyed the tour, and got to see some lovely views before ending up in Bondi. The guide, Martin, was enthusiastic but some of his jokes (especially the ones about the strip clubs in King’s across and where ‘young ladies’ could find rich old men) were not enjoyed by many. You get around 25 minutes at Bondi, so once that’s up either head back to the city with the bus or enjoy the beach and do the much recommended Bondi to Coogee walk, then jump on public transport to get back to where you want to be. The bus tour starts at 10.30am, but if you aren’t there by 10am you may well not get a space. The walking tour leaves from the same spot (Archibald Fountain in Hyde Park) so you can always go on that and reserve a spot on the bus for the next day. It also means you’ll be able to get on the bus before those who turn up the next morning, so a window seat will be all yours.

The tour finishes up at Bondi Beach
Sydney Opera House – tour and show

Obviously you can look at this unique building from outside without paying a cent, which is more than enough for lots of people. However we really wanted to see inside so booked onto a guided tour, and were really pleased we did.

Our enthusiastic and knowledgable guide told us about the history of the project, the controversy surrounding the architect, and how the performance areas are designed to achieve the best acoustics possible. On top of that we got to go backstage, saw some incredible views over the harbour, and, best of all, used our tour tickets to secure a discount to that evening’s performance. This isn’t guaranteed, but if there are tickets remaining then showing you’ve been on a tour can help. We got $110 tickets in the stalls for $49, and it was really brilliant.

You get 10% off the tour – $36 per adult instead of $40 – if you buy online beforehand. If you have accessibility issues there is a lift, but if you’re just a bit unfit you’ll have to take the (many) stairs.

The Rocks

The most historic part of Sydney, the Rocks is a great place to wander down cobbled laneways and learn about the convict settlement of the past, while enjoying excellent views and cuisine of the present.

There are markets on every weekend, and a foodie market on a Friday.

Circular Quay

Full of ferry stops and pedestrian walkways, Circular Quay is predominately visited by commuters and tourists. You’ll find shops, restaurants, and great views. Make sure you nip behind to Customs House and once you’re through the foyer, without wanting to ruin the surprise, look down.

Hyde Park

Beautiful park filled with places where you can chill out, people watch, and plan your next jaunt around the city. Plenty of coffee shops and right next to the impressive St. Mary’s Cathedral.

Ferry to Manly

Disclaimer: I didn’t actually do the ferry ride on my most recent trip as it was too windy, but I’ve done it before and it’s definitely the cheapest way to get great views of the harbour. The round trip takes about an hour, or you can get off in Manly and spend some time at the beach. Don’t get the fast ferry – it’s more expensive and harder to enjoy the views. You’re looking for the big yellow and green boat leaving Circular Quay.

Virtual Reality Room

Sydney is full of Escape Rooms – where teams need to solve puzzles and crack clues before the time runs out – and it was while searching for one of these on a rainy day that we came across the Sydney Virtual Room.

None of us had ever done anything like it before and we really weren’t sure what to expect. After we found the entrance (it can be a little hard to spot from the street – it’s to the right of Superdry) we went up in the lift and came out into a bit of a geek gamers’ den. Despite not knowing much about it, and definitely not being gamers ourselves, we were made to feel really welcome and quickly started our session. It was odd to begin with – we were all in separate rooms not really sure how the whole thing would work – but once we got sorted with our headsets and the game was launched we had a great 45 minutes travelling through time, solving puzzles and even taking a selfie together.

It was incredibly fun and really quite surreal at times – we loved it.

$49 pp ($59 at the weekend) puts it at the more expensive end of Escape Rooms, but look out for vouchers online and visit on a weekday if you can. We had a lot of fun and, given that I’ve not seen anything like it before or since, would recommend it as a great indoor option when the weather is not on your side. After you’re finished, go around the corner to Gowings at the State Theatre for an excellent (but expensive) cocktail in a stunning Art Deco bar.

A word of warning – if you’re an Escape Room enthusiast looking for highly complicated puzzles then this isn’t for you. The tasks are good and challenging enough, but the selling point here is the VR rather than the complexity.

VR fist pump

Where to eat and drink in Sydney

Kansas City Shuffle

Hidden on small street between Wynard and The Rocks, this hipster cafe offers a great breakfast and coffee menu in a warehouse type setting.

Coffee Club

A reliable Australian chain, this won’t be the most interesting place you’ll eat but you’re guaranteed good food at a reasonable price.

Two Sis

This Pyrmont cafe offers excellent brunch and good service.

Anason

Probably the best place we ate at, Anason serves Turkish food and wine in a beautiful setting at Barangaroo Wharf. It won’t break the bank but it’s not cheap – the bill for three of us (including a bottle of excellent wine) was $200. The service was excellent and the waiters were very knowledgable. If you want a water side table then make sure you call ahead.

Georges Mediterranean Bar and Grill

We stopped here more for convenience and timing than anything else. It is a lovely location and the food was fine but we wouldn’t rush back. My friend was particularly taken aback by her fish being served whole – eyeballs, head, tail, bones – without any indication of that in the menu or from the staff.

See the full menu here.

Gowings, State Theatre

We spotted this on our way to the virtual room around the corner, and were so impressed by the architecture and decor that we made a detour to come back. The cocktails were delicious (but expensive), and the interior really is stunning. You can dine here too but we already had plans to eat elsewhere, which was just as well – as we left in our shorts and t-shirts, men in tuxedos and women in cocktail dresses began to arrive.

Location, menus, and more info here.

The Opera Bar

After we had been to a performance the Opera Bar seemed the obvious place to come. This lively bar, set outside the Opera House and opposite the bridge, serves a range of drinks with limited but good food (think cheeseboard, pizzas, and snacks). There are more food options if you go before a show than after.

The price tag matches the location, but it was worth it for the overall experience.

Where to stay in Sydney

Sydney is a very expensive place to stay, and getting a room in a central location that’s both private (as opposed to a dorm bed) and clean for under $100 a night is almost impossible.

Siesta Inn

If money is tight (or you’d just rather spend it on doing things in Sydney once you’re there) Siesta Inn is a good option. It offers private Queen Doubles in a very good location from $79 per night. This price also includes Wi-fi, use of laundry and kitchen facilities, linen, towels, and basic toiletries. The catch is that the bathrooms are shared. I know that this is a deal breaker for lots of people, but as someone who isn’t overly keen on them myself I had no problem over the four nights I stayed here. There were plenty of showers and sinks, I never had to wait – in fact I never actually showered at the same time as someone else – and they were kept really clean.

Aside from a late check in experience which was slightly tricky (someone had gone on their break and not left a key for me) everything else was fine. The ‘Queen’ was two singles pushed together, which seems to be quite common, the Wi-fi was good, other guests were quiet (mainly single travellers and older couples), and although you could hear some outside noise at night this really is to be expected in a major city. My only complaint was that the blind wasn’t very thick – if you’re a light sleeper take an eye mask.

It’s very easy to get to and from the airport as it’s just a few minutes’ walk from Wynard Station.

Park Regis City Centre

I didn’t stay here but at over $1,000 for two people for six nights, my friends expected a little more from this – although that might be more about coming to terms with Sydney’s prices than anything else.

They found their room to be quite small, the water pressure in the shower low, and the 250MB Wi-fi limit per code issued frustrating. They also complained about an intermittent bad smell coming from the bathroom drains and the amount of sound that made it through the windows. However, the rooftop pool and stunning views almost made up for it.

More info on the Park Regis can be found here.

View from Park Regis rooftop

Getting to and getting around Sydney

A huge domestic and international airport means you can get to Sydney from pretty much anywhere in the world. A number of train stations, coach stops, and major roads allow plenty of options for those not flying.

If you fly in then a taxi to the CBD will set you back $40-$50, or a range of shuttle buses operate with tickets around $20. Before you book a bus do some googling – a few companies on TripAdvisor have hardly any positive reviews, but plenty of stories of missed flights, ignored phone calls, and late pick ups.

If you’re travelling alone (and therefore can’t split a cab fare) the train is probably your best option. Regular and reliable, the T8 goes from both the domestic and international terminals to key stops in the city, from which you’ll more than likely be able to walk to your accommodation. If not, you’ll be able to easily switch to a train that takes you closer. Get an Opal card (you’ll find it useful throughout your stay) and top it up with enough to cover the $17 fare. The airport charges most of this cost – if you don’t have lots of bags and don’t mind a 15 minute walk, head up to the next station, Mascot, (and get on the same train), and your ticket price drops to just a few dollars.

Once you’re in the city the Opal card can be used on all public transport, including ferries. We mainly walked, but also got the odd cab later at night – request an uber on your phone or hail one of the many white taxis you’ll see on Sydney’s streets.

If you have any questions, want help planning a trip to Sydney, or have an idea for a guest blog please email contact@talbahtstravels.com.

Remember to like my Facebook page and follow my Instagram to keep up to date with the latest blogs, photos, and travel tips.

-33.852306151.210787

Like this:

LikeLoading...

Related

Источник: https://talbahtstravels.com/2018/04/16/sydney/

Opera building melbourne - Crack Key For U -

opera vpn windows 10 dvxc



best vpn app for iphone freeIf you will come up with an argument against internet surveillance, theyopera vpn windows 10 dvxc will say that it’s for the greater good, when in fact they are snooping on your privacy.How do you explain the duality between the increasingly strict privacy regulations on the one hand, and the quick expansion of internet surveillance programs on the other hand? The strict privacy regulations are an excuse that they use to snoop on your privacy (i.The only info we do log is the customer email address, but we would never give away that information to anyone.softether githubWe had the domainname VPN.If you will come up with an argument against internet surveillance, theyopera vpn windows 10 dvxc will say that it’s for the greater good, when in fact they are snooping on your privacy.We have customers from all over the world and we are growing everyday.exprebvpn uninstall

private vpn for firestickWe NEVER log information from our customers besides their email address.asia, targeting mostly expats and foreigners in Asia.On the other hand, they are the ones who need it the most, so those who really want a VPN in China will always find their way back to us or other providers.mejor vpn para netflix androidasia and we are no different than any other VPN provider.e.A person who hacks doesn’t necessarily have to be opera vpn windows 10 dvxca thief.private internet acceb bbc iplayer

turbo vpn m apkpureasia, targeting mostly expats and foreigners in Asia.asia: What was your motivation for starting a VPN service? How has your location affected that decision? I am myself an expat living in Bangkok, Thailand.Why should the average user be worried about internet surveillance? And is there a difference between government and corporate surveillance? Personally I don’t like when people have the possibility to look into my history.avast vpn not turning onIn your opinion, what new trends and technologies can we expect to see in the vpn market over the next few years? I think the VPN providers will become more and more user-friendly, and it will be more commonly used by everyone.Nowadays there are so many people using a VPN because of the laws in all the countries.Below is the intro and first chapter of Become The Ultimate Hacker – Computer Virus, Cracking, Malware, IT Security A complete Kindle or paperback version can be purchased on Amazon.reddit best vpn for netflix

opera vpn windows 10 dvxcby ejuhjThis article has been tweeted 3014 times and contains 284 user comments.


  • nordvpn dedicated ip
  • avast vpn android
  • free vpn for iphone without subscription
  • best free vpn for torrenting
  • free vpn server client software
  • free vpn for iphone without subscription
  • betternet 5.3 0 crack
  • turbo vpn 1.4.7
  • o que e forticlient vpn
  • vpn router asus
  • best vpn for amazon fire stick
  • private internet acceb wireguard
  • vpn for microsoft windows 7
  • nordvpn dedicated ip
  • vpn android raspberry pi
  • hide me vpn for mac
  • forticlient vpn 4.0 2300
  • wireguard mesh
  • vpn hma for pc
  • surfshark watch netflix
  • vpn iphone za darmo
  • extension de hola vpn
  • watch korean netflix vpn
  • hola netflix usa
  • best free vpn for mac
  • hotspot vpn elite crack
  • norton vpn problems
  • what is vpn kill switch pia
  • surfshark vpn good
  • vpn hma key 2019
  • vpn for netflix free android
  • z vpn free
  • how to use hola vpn for netflix
  • digibit vpn raspberry pi
  • vpn us netflix free
  • Источник: http://www.mantrahealthclub.com/part/opera-vpn-windows-10-dvxc

    Rienzi

    Opera by Richard Wagner

    For other uses, see Rienzi (disambiguation).

    Rienzi, der letzte der Tribunen (Rienzi, the last of the tribunes; WWV 49) is an early opera by Richard Wagner in five acts, with the libretto written by the composer after Edward Bulwer-Lytton's novel of the same name (1835). The title is commonly shortened to Rienzi. Written between July 1838 and November 1840, it was first performed at the Königliches Hoftheater Dresden, on 20 October 1842, and was the composer's first success.

    The opera is set in Rome and is based on the life of Cola di Rienzo (1313–1354), a late medieval Italian populist figure who succeeds in outwitting and then defeating the nobles and their followers and in raising the power of the people. Magnanimous at first, he is forced by events to crush the nobles' rebellion against the people's power, but popular opinion changes and even the Church, which had urged him to assert himself, turns against him. In the end the populace burns the Capitol, in which Rienzi and a few adherents have made a last stand.

    Composition history[edit]

    Interior of the first Dresden Opera House, where Rienziwas premiered in 1842 (contemporary sketch by J. C. A. Richter)

    Rienzi is Wagner's third completed opera, and is mostly written in a grand opera style; depictions of the mob, the liberal ethos associated with the hero and the political intervention of a reactionary clergy recall La vestale, Les Huguenots, and also Fromental Halévy's La Juive. Each act ends with an extended finale ensemble and is replete with solos, duets, trios and crowd scenes. There is also an extended ballet in act 2 according to the accepted Grand Opera format. Hans von Bülow was later to joke that "Rienzi is Meyerbeer's best opera".

    Wagner began to draft the opera in Riga in 1837, after reading Lytton's novel, (although John Deathridge has argued that Wagner's work also bears the influence of Mary Russell Mitford's 1828 "highly successful English play" Rienzi). In 1839, meeting Meyerbeer by chance in Boulogne, he was able to read the latter the first three acts of the libretto, and to gain his interest. Meyerbeer also introduced Wagner to Ignaz Moscheles, who was also staying at Boulogne; as Ernest Newman comments, this was "Wagner's first meeting with real international musical celebrities". When the opera was completed in 1840, Wagner had hoped for it to be premiered at the Paris Opéra.

    Several circumstances, including his lack of influence, prevented this. Moreover, Wagner's wife Minna, in a letter of 28 October 1840 to Wagner's friend Apel, who had likely first made the suggestion that Wagner compose Rienzi,[5] mentions a plan to perform the overture to Rienzi "a fortnight hence", but contains a clear indication that her husband had just been committed to a debtors' prison. The full score of Rienzi was completed on 19 November 1840.

    In 1841 Wagner moved to Meudon, just outside Paris, where the debt laws could be more easily evaded, whilst awaiting developments for Rienzi, having already written to King Frederick Augustus II of Saxony, requesting that he order a production of the work in Dresden.

    Baron von Lüttichau (1786–1863), General Director of the Dresden Opera House from 1824

    With the support of Meyerbeer, a staging of Rienzi was arranged in Dresden; Meyerbeer wrote to the Director of the Opera in Dresden, Baron von Lüttichau, that he found the opera "rich in fantasy and of great dramatic effect". This, with the proposed staging of Der fliegende Holländer in Berlin, also supported by Meyerbeer, persuaded Wagner to return to Germany in April 1842. During rehearsals the performers were highly enthusiastic; the tenor Tichatschek, in the title role, was so impressed with a passage from act 3 (later deleted because of the opera's length), that "at each rehearsal, each of the soloists contributed a silvergroschen to [a] fund that Tichatschek had started ... No one suspected that what was an amiable joke for them was the means of buying [Wagner] an extra morsel of sorely-needed food."[10]

    The premiere of Rienzi took place on 20 October 1842 in the new Dresden Opera House, designed by the architect Gottfried Semper and opened the previous year. Semper and Wagner were later to become friends in Dresden, a connection which eventually led to Semper providing designs which became a basis of Wagner's Festspielhaus in Bayreuth.

    The first performance of Rienzi was well received in Dresden despite running over six hours (including intermissions). One legend is that, fearful of the audience departing, Wagner stopped the clock above the stage. In his later memoirs, Mein Leben, Wagner recalled:

    No subsequent experience has given me feelings even remotely similar to those I had on this day of the first performance of Rienzi. The only too well-founded anxiety as to their success has so dominated my feelings at all subsequent first performances of my works that I could never really enjoy them or take much notice of the way the audience was behaving.[...] The initial success of Rienzi was no doubt assured beforehand. But the uproarious way in which the public declared its partiality for me was extraordinary ... The public had been forcibly predisposed to accept it, because everyone connected with the theatre had been spreading such favourable reports ... that the entire population was looking forward to what was heralded as a miracle ... In trying to recall my condition that evening, I can remember it only as possessing all the features of a dream.

    Subsequently, Wagner experimented with giving the opera over two evenings (at the suggestion of von Lüttichau), and making cuts to enable a more reasonable performance in a single evening.

    Performance history[edit]

    Despite Wagner's reservations, Rienzi remained one of his most successful operas until the early 20th century. In Dresden alone, it reached its 100th performance in 1873 and 200th in 1908 and it was regularly performed throughout the 19th century in major opera houses throughout Europe and beyond, including those in America and England in 1878/9.[5] The Paris premiere of Rienzi finally took place on 6 April 1869 at the Théâtre Lyrique under the baton of Jules Pasdeloup. The US premiere took place on 4 March 1878 at the Academy of Music in New York and was followed on 27 January 1879 by the first UK performance at Her Majesty's Theatre in London. The overture was the first work performed at the inaugural Henry Wood Promenade Concert at the Queen's Hall in London in August 1895.[16]

    A staging at the English National Opera in London, produced by Nicholas Hytner in 1983, placed the hero in the context of 20th-century totalitarianism. A production by David Pountney at the Vienna State Opera in 1999 set the work in the "near future". Of this production Pountney wrote:

    Wagner invested the musical realization of Rienzi with the unashamed extravagance and tasteless exaggeration of a Las Vegas hotel ... only the self-consciously deliberate and unabashed use of kitsch could match this musical egomania.

    Other contemporary productions have been rare. Performances were given at the Theater Bremen in April/May 2009 and at the Deutsche Oper Berlin and Oper Leipzig in April/May 2010. In July 2013, the bicentennial year of Wagner's birth, performances of all three of Wagner's early operas, including Rienzi, took place for the first time at Bayreuth, at the Oberfrankenhalle.[18] This performance trimmed some parts, including the second-act ballet.[19] The Boston premiere was produced in concert by Odyssey Opera in September 2013 as their inaugural performance.[20] The Australian premiere was a concert performance by Melbourne Opera in December 2013, as part of the bicentennial celebrations.[21]

    Roles[edit]

    Carl Reißiger, conductor of the first performance of Rienzi
    Role Voice typePremiere cast, 20 October 1842
    Conductor: Carl Reißiger
    Cola Rienzi, Roman TribunetenorJosef Tichatschek
    Irene, his sistersopranoHenriette Wüst
    Stefano Colonna, a noblemanbassGeorg Wilhelm Dettmer
    Adriano, his sonsoprano (en travesti) Wilhelmine Schröder-Devrient
    Paolo Orsini, another patricianbass Johann Michael Wächter
    Raimondo, Papal Legatebass Gioacchino Vestri
    Baroncelli, Roman citizentenor Friedrich Traugott Reinhold
    Cecco del Vecchio, Roman citizenbass Karl Risse
    The Messenger of Peace soprano Anna Thiele
    Ambassadors, Nobles, Priests, Monks, Soldiers, Messengers, Populace

    Synopsis[edit]

    Overture[edit]

    Act 4, last scene, in the Dresden Opera House (1842)

    The opera opens with a substantial overture which begins with a trumpet call (which in act 3 we learn is the war call of the Colonna family) and features the melody of Rienzi's prayer at the start of act 5, which became the opera's best-known aria. The overture ends with a military march.

    Act 1[edit]

    Una via, nel fondo la chiesa del Laterano. On th right Rienzi's house, set design for Rienziact 1 (1842).

    Outside Rienzi's house

    The patrician Orsini and his cronies attempt to kidnap Rienzi's sister Irene. Stefano Colonna, also a patrician but inclined to support Rienzi, prevents them. Raimondo appeals to the parties in the name of the Church to stop their fighting; Rienzi's eventual appearance (marked by a dramatic key shift, from D to E flat) quells the riot. The Roman people support Rienzi's condemnation of the nobles. Irene and Adriano realise their mutual attraction (duet "Ja, eine Welt voll Leiden" – Yes, a world of sorrows). A gathering crowd of plebeians, inspired by Rienzi's speeches, offers Rienzi the crown; he demurs, insisting that he wishes only to be a Tribune of the Roman people.

    Act 2[edit]

    A hall in the Capitol

    The patricians plot the death of Rienzi; Adriano is horrified when he learns of this. Rienzi greets a group of ambassadors for whom an entertainment is laid on (a lengthy ballet). Orsini attempts to stab Rienzi, who however is protected by a vest of chain mail. Adriano pleads with Rienzi for mercy to the nobles, which Rienzi grants.

    The act 2 ballet is noteworthy as Wagner made a clear attempt to make it relevant to the action of the opera (whereas in most Grand Operas the ballet was simply an entertaining diversion). The Rienzi ballet was intended to tell the tale of the 'Rape of Lucretia'. This storyline (in which Tarquinius, the last king of Rome, attempts to rape the virtuous Lucretia), parallels both the action of Rienzi (Orsini's attempt on Irene) and its background (patricians versus the people). In its original form the ballet lasts for over half an hour – in modern performances and recordings it is generally drastically cut.

    Act 3[edit]

    The Roman Forum

    The patricians have recruited an army to march on Rome. The people are alarmed. Rienzi rouses the people and leads them to victory over the nobles, in the course of which Adriano's father Stefano is killed. Adriano swears revenge, but Rienzi dismisses him.

    Act 4[edit]

    Before the Lateran Church

    Cecco and other citizens discuss the negotiations of the patricians with the Pope and with the Emperor of Germany. Adriano's intention to kill Rienzi wavers when Rienzi arrives together with Irene. Raimondo now announces that the Pope has laid a papal ban on Rienzi, and that his associates risk excommunication. Despite Adriano's urgings, Irene resolves to stay with Rienzi.

    Act 5[edit]

    Scene 1: A room in the Capitol

    Rienzi in his prayer "Allmächt'ger Vater" (Almighty Father!) asserts his faith in the people of Rome. He suggests to Irene that she seek safety with Adriano, but she demurs. An apologetic Adriano enters and tells the pair that the Capitol is to be burnt and they are at risk.

    Scene 2: The Capitol is ablaze

    Rienzi's attempts to speak are met with stones and insults from the fickle crowd. Adriano, in trying to rescue Rienzi and Irene, is killed with them as the building collapses.

    In the original performances, Rienzi's final words are bitter and pessimistic: "May the town be accursed and destroyed! Disintegrate and wither, Rome! Your degenerate people wish it so." However, for the 1847 Berlin performance Wagner substituted a more upbeat rhetoric: "Ever while the seven hills of Rome remain, ever while the eternal city stands, you will see Rienzi's return!".[23]

    Reception and performances[edit]

    Rienzi was an immediate success. This, his first real success of any kind, was crucial in Wagner's career, launching him as a composer to be reckoned with. It was followed, within months, by his appointment as Kapellmeister at the Dresden Opera (February 1843), which also gave him considerable prestige. It also received critical acclaim elsewhere in Europe. The young Eduard Hanslick, later to be one of Wagner's foremost critical adversaries, wrote in 1846 in Vienna:

    I am of the firm opinion that [Rienzi] is the finest thing achieved in grand opera in the last twelve years, that it is the most significant dramatic creation since Les Huguenots, and that it is just as epoch-making for its own time as were Les Huguenots, Der Freischütz, and Don Giovanni, each for its respective period of musical history.[25]

    Other critical comments through the ages have included (apart from von Bulow's jibe about it being 'Meyerbeer's best opera'), 'Meyerbeer's worst opera' (Charles Rosen), 'an attack of musical measles' (Ernest Newman) and ' the greatest musical drama ever composed' (Gustav Mahler).

    Franz Liszt wrote a "Fantasy on Themes from Rienzi" (S. 439) for piano in 1859.[27]

    Wagner later perceived Rienzi as an embarrassment; in his 1852 autobiographical essay, "A Communication to My Friends", he wrote "I saw it only in the shape of 'five acts', with five brilliant 'finales', with hymns, processions and the musical clash of arms".[28]Cosima Wagner recorded Wagner's comment in her diary for 20 June 1871:

    Rienzi is very repugnant to me, but they should at least recognize the fire in it; I was a music director and I wrote a grand opera; the fact that it was this same music director who gave them some hard nuts to crack – that's what should astonish them.[29]

    Thus the work has remained outside today's Wagner canon, and was only performed at the Bayreuth Festival in 2013, staged by Matthias von Stegmann. Although the composer disclaimed it, it can be noted that Rienzi prefigures themes (brother/sister relationships, social order and revolution) to which Wagner was often to return in his later works.

    Rienzi and Adolf Hitler[edit]

    August Kubizek, a boyhood friend of Adolf Hitler, claimed that Hitler was so influenced by seeing Rienzi as a young man in 1906 or 1907 that it triggered his political career, and that when Kubizek reminded Hitler, in 1939 at Bayreuth, of his exultant response to the opera Hitler had replied, "At that hour it all began!"[30] Although Kubizek's veracity has been seriously questioned, it is known that Hitler possessed the original manuscript of the opera, which he had requested and been given as a fiftieth birthday present in 1939. The manuscript was with Hitler in his bunker; it was either stolen, lost or destroyed by fire in the destruction of the bunker's contents after Hitler's death (the manuscript of Wagner's earlier work Die Feen is believed to have met with the same fate). Thomas Grey comments:

    In every step of Rienzi's career – from ... acclamation as leader of the Volk, through military struggle, violent suppression of mutinous factions, betrayal and ... final immolation – Hitler would doubtless have found sustenance for his fantasies.

    Albert Speer claims to have remembered an incident when Robert Ley advocated using a modern composition to open the Party Rallies in Nuremberg, but Hitler rejected this idea:

    "You know, Ley, it isn't by chance that I have the Party Rallies open with the overture to Rienzi. It's not just a musical question. At the age of twenty-four this man, an innkeeper's son, persuaded the Roman people to drive out the corrupt Senate by reminding them of the magnificent past of the Roman Empire. Listening to this blessed music as a young man in the theater at Linz, I had the vision that I too must someday succeed in uniting the German Empire and making it great once more."

    Editions[edit]

    The original performance version of Rienzi was lost in the Dresden bombing of 1945,[23] and the manuscript (on which it had been based) was lost in Berlin in 1945. No full copies had been made of either version, as far as is known. However, Rienzi was never established by the composer into a finalized version, so all performances of it since 1945 have been reconstructions.

    A vocal score of the early 1840s, based on Wagner's draft, remains as the only existing primary source. Two surviving full scores made in Dresden in the early 1840s (under Wagner's supervision) already reflect the heavy cuts made in performances. The first printed score that was made under Wagner's supervision in 1844 reflects even heavier cuts.

    A critical edition of the opera was prepared by Schott's in Mainz in 1976 as volume III of their scholarly complete edition of Wagner's works. This edition was edited by Wagner scholars Reinhard Strohm and Egon Voss; it uses the extant sources but also contains the 1844 piano version prepared by Gustav Klink, (which includes some of the passages excised from early performances).

    Overall it is not possible to accurately reconstruct Wagner's "original" Rienzi, but Rienzi on the other hand was clearly never finished by the composer. It was constantly being altered during the 1840s (and, it seems, possibly throughout Wagner's lifetime), so it is not feasible to fully determine Wagner's exact or final intentions based on existing evidence.

    Recordings[edit]

    Complete recordings (and performances) of Rienzi are rare, although the overture is regularly found on radio broadcasts and compilation CDs. Significant cuts to the score are common in recordings. Rienzi was released on DVD and Blu-ray in 2010. The production was directed by Philipp Stölzl, and performed by the Deutsche Oper Berlin under the baton of Sebastian Lang-Lessing, with Torsten Kerl in the title role.

    Recordings include:

    • Winfried Zillig conducting the Sinfonieorchester des Hessischen Rundfunks. Günther Treptow, Trude Eipperle, Helmut Fehn, Erna Schlüter, Rudolf Gonszar, Heinz Prybit. Frankfurt, 1950.
    • Josef Krips conducting the Vienna Symphony Orchestra. Set Svanholm, Walter Berry, Christa Ludwig, Alois Pernerstorfer, Paul Schöffler. 1960 (Melodram).
    • Heinrich Hollreiser conducting the Dresden Staatskapelle. René Kollo, Siv Wennberg, Janis Martin, Theo Adam. 1976 (EMI). (Complete recording of Wagner's shortened 1843 version)
    • Edward Downes conducting the BBC Northern Symphony Orchestra. John Mitchinson, Lorna Haywood, Michael Langdon, Raimund Herincx. 1976 (Ponto POCD1040) (Complete and uncut recording of Wagner's "original" 1842 version)
    • Wolfgang Sawallisch conducting the Bavarian State Opera Orchestra. René Kollo, Jan-Hendrik Rootering, Cheryl Studer, John Janssen. 1983 (Orfeo d'Oro)
    • Sebastian Weigle conducting the Frankfurter Opern- und Museumorchester. Peter Bronder, Christiane Libor, Falk Struckmann, Claudia Mahnke. 2013 (Oehms Classics)

    Recordings of the overture include: Hans Knappertsbusch conducting the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Otto Klemperer conducting the Philharmonia Orchestra, James Levine conducting the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, Arturo Toscanini conducting the NBC Symphony Orchestra, George Szell conducting the Cleveland Orchestra, Lorin Maazel conducting the Philharmonia Orchestra, Leopold Stokowski conducting the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Zubin Mehta conducting the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, Mariss Jansons conducting the Oslo Philharmonic, Daniel Barenboim conducting the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and Karl Böhm conducting the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra.

    References[edit]

    Notes[edit]

    1. ^ abMillington 1992b
    2. ^Newman 1976, I, 340; see also Wagner 1992, p. 229
    3. ^"10 August 1895: The first ever 'First Night of the Proms". The Royal Albert Hall. Royal Albert Hall. 10 August 2015.
    4. ^Wagnerjahr-2013Archived 2013-07-25 at the Wayback Machine, accessed 10 July 2013
    5. ^"Guerrilla Opera: Reflections on Bicentennial Rienzi at Bayreuth's Oberfrankenhalle" by Michael Teager, 31 December 2013
    6. ^"Reviews for Rienzi". Odyssey Opera. Retrieved 2021-05-24.
    7. ^"Melbourne Opera's performs Rienzi, a lumpish curiosity piece not one of Wagner's best" by Michael Shmith, The Sydney Morning Herald, 10 December 2013
    8. ^ abStrohm 1976, p. 725
    9. ^cited in Charlton 2003, p. 332
    10. ^Phantasiestück über Motive aus Rienzi, S. 439: Scores at the International Music Score Library Project
    11. ^cited in Charlton 2003, p. 328
    12. ^cited in Millington 1999, p. 10
    13. ^Kershaw 2000, p. 198. Kershaw comments: "Hitler probably believed his own myth. Kubizek certainly did."

    Sources[edit]

    • Charlton, David, ed. (2003). The Cambridge Companion to Grand Opera. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    • Deathridge, John (September 1983). "Rienzi...A Few of the Facts". The Musical Times. 124 (1687): 546–549. doi:10.2307/962386. JSTOR 962386.
    • Feustel, Gotthard (1998). Episoden aus der Semperoper. Leipzig.
    • Grey, Thomas S., ed. (2008). The Cambridge Companion to Wagner. Cambridge Companions to Music. Cambridge University Press.
    • Gutman, Robert W. (1990). Wagner: The Man, His Mind and His Music. New York.
    • Holden, Amanda, ed. (2001). The New Penguin Opera Guide. New York: Penguin Putnam. ISBN .
    • Karlsson, Jonas (2012). "'In that hour it began'? Hitler, Rienzi, and the Trustworthiness of August Kubizek's The Young Hitler I knew". The Wagner Journal. 6 (2): 33–47.
    • Kershaw, Ian (2000). Hitler 1936–1945: Nemesis. London: Allen Lane: The Penguin Press. ISBN .
    • Meyerbeer, Giacomo (1975). H. and G. Becker (ed.). Briefwechsel und Tagebücher. III (1837–1845). Berlin.
    • Millington, Barry (1992a). The Wagner Compendium. London: Faber.
    • Millington, Barry (1992b). "Rienzi, der Letzte der Tribunen". In Stanley Sadie (ed.). The New Grove Dictionary of Opera. Grove Music Online.
    • Millington, Barry (1999). "Rienzi: an opera in the grand style", programme notes to EMI Classics recording (Staatskapelle Dresden, Heinrich Hollreiser).
    • Newman, Ernest (1976). The Life of Richard Wagner ((4 volumes)). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    • Speer, Albert (1976). Spandau: The Secret Diaries. Translated by Richard and Clara Winston. Macmillan.
    • Strohm, Reinhard (September 1976). "Rienzi and Authenticity". The Musical Times. 117 (1603): 725–727. doi:10.2307/957730. JSTOR 957730.
    • Vaget, Hans Rudolf (2003). "The political ramifications of Hitler's cult of Wagner"(PDF). Hamburg. Retrieved 29 December 2009.
    • Wagner, Richard (1992). My Life. Translated by Andrew Gray. New York.

    Further reading[edit]

    External links[edit]

    Wikimedia Commons has media related to Rienzi.
    Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rienzi

    Menu

    A progression of rare and beautiful ingredients where texture, flavour and harmony is paramount. Delve into the Quay dining experience with Peter Gilmore’s Menu and thoughtfully curated Wine List by Fink Wine Director, Amanda Yallop, and Quay Head Sommelier, Shanteh Wong.

    Read more

    Peter Gilmore

    Peter’s appreciation of nature’s diversity and his endless experimentation in the kitchen and garden are the driving forces in his cooking. Peter leads the Quay team with a focus on excellence, innovation and hospitality.

    Read More

    Events

    Celebrate at one of Australia’s most awarded restaurants, with panoramic views encompassing the Sydney Harbour Bridge and Sydney Opera House. From intimate dinner parties in the Private Dining Room, to large cocktail events in The Green Room.

    Read More

    SPECIAL EVENT

    New Year’s Eve

    New Year’s Eve at Quay For a spectacular celebration this New Year’s Eve, look no further than Quay. Experience a

    Read More

    SPECIAL EVENT DAY

    Christmas Day at Quay

    Experience unforgettable service and a decadent five-course menu by Executive Chef Peter Gilmore this Christmas Day with a long lunch

    Read More

    2021 -2022

    Festive Season Trading

    Quay will be open for select dates throughout the festive season. We look forward to welcoming you to Quay, and

    Read More

    RECIPE

    Peter Gilmore’s Korean Chicken Soup

    Peter’s Korean Chicken Soup Recipe and photography from The Great Australian Cook Book Serves 6   Ingredients 1.8kg whole free-range

    Read More

    CHANGES IN ACCESS TO QUAY

    Restaurant Directions

    Temporary North Bound Traffic Changes Affecting Access to Quay The extension of the Rocks Markets activation has seen the closure

    Read More

    Make A Reservation

    Make A
    Reservation

    We look forward to welcoming you to Quay.

    Please note you will receive a confirmation email once your reservation has been successful. If you do not receive this confirmation email, there may have been an error in your reservation. Please contact our reservations team on (02) 9251 5600 if you have any queries.

    Источник: https://www.quay.com.au/

    One of the benefits of Australia arguing over what should be its capital (and ultimately creating Canberra for that purpose) is that Melbourne and Sydney seem to be perpetually competing to be seen as the country’s top city. Comparisons between the two by tourists are common, but nobody does it more than the inhabitants of the cities themselves. This real but friendly rivalry is excellent news for residents and visitors alike, as each city strives to out do the other and provide the best possible place to live, work, and explore.

    For me Sydney has more of the iconic sites – if you ask people to conjure up an image of Oz the white sails of the Opera House to the left of the Sydney Harbour Bridge will be at the top of most lists – but Melbourne has a stronger sense of character.

    Often referred to as the City of Villages, over time Sydney has expanded to encompass a huge number of previously distinct communities that have now become suburbs. However unlike other places (such as London) which have done the same, Sydney still seems to be lacking that real consolidated central hub which encompasses the key components for tourists. There is nothing comparable to the relatively small area from London’s Southbank up to Oxford Street which contains the Eye, the Thames, Westminster, Whitehall, Trafalgar Square, Buckingham Palace, St James’ Park, Green Park, the edge of Hyde Park, Leicester Square and Piccadilly Circus all within a couple of square miles.

    I’m not saying it’s a problem, and I have very much enjoyed all the time I have spent in Sydney. However if you have the right expectation before you go – that this City of Villages lives up to its nickname and the things to explore are spread out – you won’t spend time searching for something that isn’t there. Instead you can get straight on with exploring the harbour, discovering the Rocks, walking across that iconic bridge and generally enjoying all the excitement Sydney has to offer.

    Like Melbourne, Sydney is not a cheap place to visit. Meals and drinks out tend to be on the dearer side, and most places have a 15-20% surcharge on public holidays. The higher pricing is largely because the wages in Oz tend to be better than in the UK or the US. Yay for Australians but tougher for tourists. The good news is there is a huge amount to do for free, and if you get a place with a kitchenette you can fill up on a big breakfast before you go out. There is also no expectation to tip, and taxes are included as standard, which means the price you see is the price you pay.

    Things to do in Sydney

    $18 bus tour

    Free Tours Sydney offers a walking tour and a bus tour. Much like I’m Free Sydney, the tours are officially free but you tip the guide what you think the tour was worth. There’s not much pressure, so if you genuinely can’t afford it you don’t need to give anything, but by the end if you have the money you’ll think it’s only fair.The bus tour is a little different in that you pay $18 up front to cover costs, then add anything at the end you’d like to. We enjoyed the tour, and got to see some lovely views before ending up in Bondi. The guide, Martin, was enthusiastic but some of his jokes (especially the ones about the strip clubs in King’s across and where ‘young ladies’ could find rich old men) were not enjoyed by many. You get around 25 minutes at Bondi, so once that’s up either head back to the city with the bus or enjoy the beach and do the much recommended Bondi to Coogee walk, then jump on public transport to get back to where you want to be. The bus tour starts at 10.30am, but if you aren’t there by 10am you may well not get a space. The walking tour leaves from the same spot (Archibald Fountain in Hyde Park) so you can always go on that and reserve a spot on the bus for the next day. It also means you’ll be able to get on the bus before those who turn up the next morning, so a window seat will be all yours.

    The tour finishes up at Bondi Beach
    Sydney Opera House – tour and show

    Obviously you can look at this unique building from outside without paying a cent, which is more than enough for lots of people. However we really wanted to see inside so booked onto a guided tour, and were really pleased we did.

    Our enthusiastic and knowledgable guide told us about the history of the project, the controversy surrounding the architect, and how the performance areas are designed to achieve the best acoustics possible. On top of that we got to go backstage, saw some incredible views over the harbour, and, best of all, used our tour tickets to secure a discount to that evening’s performance. This isn’t guaranteed, but if there are tickets remaining then showing you’ve been on a tour can help. We got $110 tickets in the stalls for $49, and it was really brilliant.

    You get 10% off the tour – $36 per adult instead of $40 – if you buy online beforehand. If you have accessibility issues there is a lift, but if you’re just a bit unfit you’ll have to take the (many) stairs.

    The Rocks

    The most historic part of Sydney, the Rocks is a great place to wander down cobbled laneways and learn about the convict settlement of the past, while enjoying excellent views and cuisine of the present.

    There are markets on every weekend, and a foodie market on a Friday.

    Circular Quay

    Full of ferry stops and pedestrian walkways, Circular Quay is predominately visited by commuters and tourists. You’ll find shops, restaurants, and great views. Make sure you nip behind to Customs House and once you’re through the foyer, without wanting to ruin the surprise, look down.

    Hyde Park

    Beautiful park filled with places where you can chill out, people watch, and plan your next jaunt around the city. Plenty of coffee shops and right next to the impressive St. Mary’s Cathedral.

    Ferry to Manly

    Disclaimer: I didn’t actually do the ferry ride on my most recent trip as it was too windy, but I’ve done it before and it’s definitely the cheapest way to get great views of the harbour. The round trip takes about an hour, or you can get off in Manly and spend some time at the beach. Don’t get the fast ferry – it’s more expensive and harder to enjoy the views. You’re looking for the big yellow and green boat leaving Circular Quay.

    Virtual Reality Room

    Sydney is full of Escape Rooms – where teams need to solve puzzles and crack clues before the time runs out – and it was while searching for one of these on a rainy day that we came across the Sydney Virtual Room.

    None of us had ever done anything like it before and we really weren’t sure what to expect. After we found the entrance (it can be a little hard to spot from the street – it’s to the right of Superdry) we went up in the lift and came out into a bit of a geek gamers’ den. Despite not knowing much about it, and definitely not being gamers ourselves, we were made to feel really welcome and quickly started our session. It was odd to begin with – we were all in separate rooms not really sure how the whole thing would work – but once we got sorted with our headsets and the game was launched we had a great 45 minutes travelling through time, solving puzzles and even taking a selfie together.

    It was incredibly fun and really quite surreal at times – we loved it.

    $49 pp ($59 at the weekend) puts it at the more expensive end of Escape Rooms, but look out for vouchers online and visit on a weekday if you can. We had a lot of fun and, given that I’ve not seen anything like it before or since, would recommend it as a great indoor option when the weather is not on your side. After you’re finished, go around the corner to Gowings at the State Theatre for an excellent (but expensive) cocktail in a stunning Art Deco bar.

    A word of warning – if you’re an Escape Room enthusiast looking for highly complicated puzzles then this isn’t for you. The tasks are good and challenging enough, but the selling point here is the VR rather than the complexity.

    VR fist pump

    Where to eat and drink in Sydney

    Kansas City Shuffle

    Hidden on small street between Wynard and The Rocks, this hipster cafe offers a great breakfast and coffee menu in a warehouse type setting.

    Coffee Club

    A reliable Australian chain, this won’t be the most interesting place you’ll eat but you’re guaranteed good food at a reasonable price.

    Two Sis

    This Pyrmont cafe offers excellent brunch and good service.

    Anason

    Probably the best place we ate at, Anason serves Turkish food and wine in a beautiful setting at Barangaroo Wharf. It won’t break the bank but it’s not cheap – the bill for three of us (including a bottle of excellent wine) was $200. The service was excellent and the waiters were very knowledgable. If you want a water side table then make sure you call ahead.

    Georges Mediterranean Bar and Grill

    We stopped here more for convenience and timing than anything else. It is a lovely location and the food was fine but we wouldn’t rush back. My friend was particularly taken aback by her fish being served whole – eyeballs, head, tail, bones – without any indication of that in the menu or from the staff.

    See the full menu here.

    Gowings, State Theatre

    We spotted this on our way to the virtual room around the corner, and were so impressed by the architecture and decor that we made a detour to come back. The cocktails were delicious (but expensive), and the interior really is stunning. You can dine here too but we already had plans to eat elsewhere, which was just as well – as we left in our shorts and t-shirts, men in tuxedos and women in cocktail dresses began to arrive.

    Location, menus, and more info here.

    The Opera Bar

    After we had been to a performance the Opera Bar seemed the obvious place to come. This lively bar, set outside the Opera House and opposite the bridge, serves a range of drinks with limited but good food (think cheeseboard, pizzas, and snacks). There are more food options if you go before a show than after.

    The price tag matches the location, but it was worth it for the overall experience.

    Where to stay in Sydney

    Sydney is a very expensive place to stay, and getting a room in a central location that’s both private (as opposed to a dorm bed) and clean for under $100 a night is almost impossible.

    Siesta Inn

    If money is tight (or you’d just rather spend it on doing things in Sydney once you’re there) Siesta Inn is a good option. It offers private Queen Doubles in a very good location from $79 per night. This price also includes Wi-fi, use of laundry and kitchen facilities, linen, towels, and basic toiletries. The catch is that the bathrooms are shared. I know that this is a deal breaker for lots of people, but as someone who isn’t overly keen on them myself I had no problem over the four nights I stayed here. There were plenty of showers and sinks, I never had to wait – in fact I never actually showered at the same time as someone else – and they were kept really clean.

    Aside from a late check in experience which was slightly tricky (someone had gone on their break and not left a key for me) everything else was fine. The ‘Queen’ was two singles pushed together, which seems to be quite common, the Wi-fi was good, other guests were quiet (mainly single travellers and older couples), and although you could hear some outside noise at night this really is to be expected in a major city. My only complaint was that the blind wasn’t very thick – if you’re a light sleeper take an eye mask.

    It’s very easy to get to and from the airport as it’s just a few minutes’ walk from Wynard Station.

    Park Regis City Centre

    I didn’t stay here but at over $1,000 for two people for six nights, my friends expected a little more from this – although that might be more about coming to terms with Sydney’s prices than anything else.

    They found their room to be quite small, the water pressure in the shower low, and the 250MB Wi-fi limit per code issued frustrating. They also complained about an intermittent bad smell coming from the bathroom drains and the amount of sound that made it through the windows. However, the rooftop pool and stunning views almost made up for it.

    More info on the Park Regis can be found here.

    View from Park Regis rooftop

    Getting to and getting around Sydney

    A huge domestic and international airport means you can get to Sydney from pretty much anywhere in the world. A number of train stations, coach stops, and major roads allow plenty of options for those not flying.

    If you fly in then a taxi to the CBD will set you back $40-$50, or a range of shuttle buses operate with tickets around $20. Before you book a bus do some googling – a few companies on TripAdvisor have hardly any positive reviews, but plenty of stories of missed flights, ignored phone calls, and late pick ups.

    If you’re travelling alone (and therefore can’t split a cab fare) the train is probably your best option. Regular and reliable, the T8 goes from both the domestic and international terminals to key stops in the city, from which you’ll more than likely be able to walk to your accommodation. If not, you’ll be able to easily switch to a train that takes you closer. Get an Opal card (you’ll find it useful throughout your stay) and top it up with enough to cover the $17 fare. The airport charges most of this cost – if you don’t have lots of bags and don’t mind a 15 minute walk, head up to the next station, Mascot, (and get on the same train), and your ticket price drops to just a few dollars.

    Once you’re in the city the Opal card can be used on all public transport, including ferries. We mainly walked, but also got the odd cab later at night – request an uber on your phone or hail one of the many white taxis you’ll see on Sydney’s streets.

    If you have any questions, want help planning a trip to Sydney, or have an idea for a guest blog please email contact@talbahtstravels.com.

    Remember to like my Facebook page and follow my Instagram to keep up to date with the latest blogs, photos, and travel tips.

    -33.852306151.210787

    Like this:

    LikeLoading...

    Related

    Источник: https://talbahtstravels.com/2018/04/16/sydney/

    Sydney Opera House cracks down on selfie sticks

    This was published 6 years ago

    Out it came, during the second interval of Turandot. Up in the stage left circle, an opera lover decided to capture the moment by taking a snap of himself and his friend with the aid of a selfie stick, which he extended over the heads of opera-goers in front of him.

    Before he managed to squeeze off a shot, a Sydney Opera House usher swept in and shut him down. Selfies are encouraged by Opera Australia during the interval but they can only be done at arm's length, not with a selfie stick.

    The Sydney Opera House has joined the list of cultural institutions worldwide to crack down on the use of the telescopic camera attachment, derisively known as the "wand of Narcissus".

    A spokeswoman for the Sydney Opera House, which was the most instagrammed site in Australia last year, confirmed taking photos during performances is prohibited. But they do permit visitors to take selfies outside the iconic building and in the foyers. "In fact, for our summer and Vivid campaigns this year, we produced precinct maps highlighting the Opera House's best selfie spots," she said.

    However, the use of selfie sticks inside the building's performance spaces is "strongly discouraged".

    Selfie sticks, which allow users to capture a wider field of view with their smartphone cameras, are a common sight on the steps of the Sydney Opera House, which recently came 13th on a global list of Top Selfie Sites. (The Eiffel Tower topped the list.)

    But worldwide, it's becoming harder to wave the wand in public. This week, Disney banned selfie sticks at all four Walt Disney World theme parks in Florida and two Disneyland parks in California, as well as theme parks in Paris and Hong Kong. The Colosseum in Rome, the Palace of Versailles near Paris and Beijing's Forbidden City are all stick-free zones.

    The world's palaces of high culture are also wary of the wand. Cloak your stick if you want to visit London's National Gallery, New York's Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) or the Guggenheim. You can't use one in any of the 19 Smithsonian museums and galleries in the United States, or in the Art Institute of Chicago or the Getty Centre in Los Angeles. Even the Canadian Museum of Human Rights in Winnepeg has its limits.

    Locally, the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne and the National Portrait Gallery and National Gallery of Australia in Canberra have banned telescopic camera attachments. Other institutions are currently formulating their policy.

    At the moment, Sydney's Museum of Contemporary Art manages selfie-stick situations "on a case-by-case scenario", says the MCA's head of communications, Myriam Conrie.

    "If the growing presence of selfie sticks in the museum were to become an issue - endangering artworks or visitors safety - we would reconsider," she said.

    Selfie sticks are not banned at the Art Gallery of NSW, but "as the protection of artwork is of paramount importance, we are continually assessing their usage within the gallery," a spokesperson said. "To date, there have been no incidents involving selfie sticks that have put artwork at risk."

    Lyndon Terracini, artistic director of Opera Australia, says he is pro-selfie, as long as it doesn't irritate others.

    "I love that people want to share their opera experience with their friends by taking selfies, with or without a stick," he says. "It's a fantastic way for us to reach potential new audiences. I'm more than happy for audience members to do that before the opera begins or at interval, but not during the production when it could disturb performers or other patrons.

    "During this year's Handa Opera on the Harbour production of Aida, we actively encouraged patrons to take selfies with the giant head of Nefertiti in the background as part of a competition. Ironically, the selfie judged best won a prize of tickets to Turandot. I wonder if it was the same person?"

    Snap Happy!

    The Sydney Opera House is one of the most photographed buildings in the world, according to Encyclopedia Britannica. Each year, 8.2 million people visit the site, with thousands of tourists snapping a photo of themselves and instantly posting it to social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, where there are more than 150,000 photos under #sydneyoperahouse. The Sydney Opera House was the most "instagrammed" site in Australia in 2014. And if you can't get your own photo, the Sydney Opera House provides endless photos on it's own Instagram account, which has more than 20,000 followers.

    From our partners

    Источник: https://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/sydney-opera-house-cracks-down-on-selfie-sticks-20150702-gi3bob.html

    Slang for ~term~

    Urban Thesaurus

    The Urban Thesaurus was created by indexing millions of different slang terms which are defined on sites like Urban Dictionary. These indexes are then used to find usage correlations between slang terms. The official Urban Dictionary API is used to show the hover-definitions. Note that this thesaurus is not in any way affiliated with Urban Dictionary.

    Due to the way the algorithm works, the thesaurus gives you mostly related slang words, rather than exact synonyms. The higher the terms are in the list, the more likely that they're relevant to the word or phrase that you searched for. The search algorithm handles phrases and strings of words quite well, so for example if you want words that are related to lol and rofl you can type in lol rofl and it should give you a pile of related slang terms. Or you might try boyfriend or girlfriend to get words that can mean either one of these (e.g. bae). Please also note that due to the nature of the internet (and especially UD), there will often be many terrible and offensive terms in the results.

    There is still lots of work to be done to get this slang thesaurus to give consistently good results, but I think it's at the stage where it could be useful to people, which is why I released it.

    Special thanks to the contributors of the open-source code that was used in this project: @krisk, @HubSpot, and @mongodb.

    Finally, you might like to check out the growing collection of curated slang words for different topics over at Slangpedia.

    Please note that Urban Thesaurus uses third party scripts (such as Google Analytics and advertisements) which use cookies. To learn more, see the privacy policy.

    Recent Slang Thesaurus Queries

    Источник: https://urbanthesaurus.org/synonyms/sydney%20opera%20house

    Blog

    Israels Plads (Copenhagen) in 2018 & 2020

     


    With no vaccine or cure available for the pandemic, physical space has now become the mechanism to fight, prevent, and control the spread, while providing the intrinsic benefits these places offer. But success is far from guaranteed. Therefore the way that cities leverage the public realm as part of a their re-opening strategy could hold far reaching social and economic consequences in addition to the obvious health impacts. 

    On March 13th, Denmark was one of the first countries to “lock-down”, closing businesses, stores, restaurants and schools. With support from the City of Copenhagen and the Foundation Realdania, the Gehl team quickly mobilized to understand how people use the city when only the most essential and basic functions in the city are open. Using our digital platform, we carried out observational data collection in four Danish cities. We supplemented this with an online surveys and will be carrying out follow-up qualitative studies including on-site interviews of people in public space.

    In our study, we found downtowns largely deserted but local meeting places thriving.  We observed that the amount of people spending time in public space, exercising and playing had also increased. And that there is a higher percentage of kids and elderly people in public spaces and a greater percentage of women than men, than in studies carried out pre-COVID-19.

    There are two main questions that are guiding our work –

     

    1. Will things ever go back to the way they were?

    Probably not completely – think about how the airport security worked before 9-11. This crisis has shown us the power of behaviour change – both how adaptable humans are, and how much of an impact that adaptation can have on our society – socially, environmentally, and of course economically. The key will be to build on the sense of community and social cohesion while overcoming the current economic crisis, in a way that catalyses the start to a sustainable and climate-ready transition. 

     

    2. Are there things that we are doing now, that will become part of the “new normal”?

    We see a few trends in public space that we think might be here for good.In Copenhagen, the popularity of local meeting places in adjacent neighbourhoods (2-2.5 times as much use compared to pre-lockdown data) indicate that school yards, pocket parks and small squares serve more of an outsize role in urban life than we might have previously appreciated. Conversely downtown areas with predominant retail use were largely deserted during the lockdown. After getting used to online shopping and working from home, inviting people back to these areas will take thoughtful design and careful consideration about the  unique experiences these locations can offer.

    Here is a report of our findings –

    Link – Click Here


     

    Learn more here:

     


     


    Local meeting places in adjacent city neighborhoods are being used more during COVID-19

     


    Overall mobility has decreased, but pedestrian movement is increasing in neighborhoods outside of the city center.


     

    In addition to observational analysis in Denmark,
    we performed a global online survey to understand public space usage during COVID-19. Learn more here:

     


    Источник: https://gehlpeople.com/
    opera building melbourne  - Crack Key For U

    Notice: Undefined variable: z_bot in /sites/travelafter.us/crack-key-for/opera-building-melbourne-crack-key-for-u.php on line 109

    Notice: Undefined variable: z_empty in /sites/travelafter.us/crack-key-for/opera-building-melbourne-crack-key-for-u.php on line 109

    Posted inCrack Key For

    1 thoughts on “Opera building melbourne - Crack Key For U”

    • Black Magic says:

      Absolute life saver man thank you so much. Been trying to get audio into twitch for so long trying all sorts of methods and this one is it. Subbed man thanks again

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *