Oct 02 2012

google chrome account  - Crack Key For U

This is the product key you want if you encounter product activation issues in Windows 10. OEM Key OR Retail: ShowKeyPlus will check for the. Devices without keyboard (tablet): Use the Volume-Up and Volume-Down keys to select If you're a Linux hacker, you probably know that Google Chrome OS is. You may also come across invalid SSL certificate error. SSL Certificate error in a browser is also known as Chrome SSL Connection Error.

Google chrome account - Crack Key For U -

Data Centers Источник: https://www.zdnet.com/article/how-to-lock-down-your-google-account-and-keep-it-safe-from-outside-attackers/
CXO

When a Microsoft product collects age, and there is an age in your jurisdiction under which parental consent or authorization is required to use the product, the product will either block users under that age or will ask them to provide consent or authorization from a parent or guardian before they can use it. We will not knowingly ask children under that age to provide more data than is required to provide for the product.

Once parental consent or authorization is granted, the child's account is treated much like any other account. The child can access communication services, like Outlook and Skype, and can freely communicate and share data with other users of all ages. Learn more about parental consent and Microsoft child accounts.

Parents or guardians can change or revoke the consent choices previously made, and review, edit, or request the deletion of the personal data of the children for whom they provided consent or authorization. As the organizer of a Microsoft family group, the parent or guardian can manage a child’s information and settings on their Family Safety page and view and delete a child’s data on their privacy dashboard.

Select Learn more below for more information about children and Xbox profiles.

When a Microsoft product collects age, and there is an age in your jurisdiction under which parental consent or authorization is required to use the product, the product will either block users under that age or will ask them to provide consent or authorization from a parent or guardian before they can use it. We will not knowingly ask children under that age to provide more data than is required to provide for the product.

Once parental consent or authorization is granted, the child's account is treated much like any other account. The child can access communication services, like Outlook and Skype, and can freely communicate and share data with other users of all ages. Learn more about parental consent and Microsoft child accounts.

Parents or guardians can change or revoke the consent choices previously made, and review, edit, or request the deletion of the personal data of the children for whom they provided consent or authorization. As the organizer of a Microsoft family group, the parent or guardian can manage a child’s information and settings on their Family Safety page and view and delete a child’s data on their privacy dashboard.

Below is additional information about the collection of data from children as related to Xbox.

What is Xbox? Xbox is the gaming and entertainment division of Microsoft. Xbox hosts an online network that consists of software and enables online experiences crossing multiple platforms. This network lets your child find and play games, view content, and connect with friends on Xbox and other gaming and social networks. Children can connect to the Xbox network using Xbox consoles, Windows devices, and mobile devices (Android and iPhone).

Xbox consoles are devices your child can use to find and play games, movies, music, and other digital entertainment. When they sign in to Xbox, in apps, games or on a console, we assign a unique identifier to their device. For instance, when their Xbox console is connected to the internet and they sign in to the console, we identify which console and which version of the console’s operating system they are using.

Xbox continues to provide new experiences in client apps that are connected to and backed by services such as Xbox network and cloud gaming. When signed in to an Xbox experience, we collect required data to help keep these experiences reliable, up to date, secure, and performing as expected.

Data we collect when you create an Xbox profile. You as the parent or guardian are required to consent to the collection of personal data from a child under 13 years old. With your permission, your child can have an Xbox profile and use the online Xbox network. During the child Xbox profile creation, you will sign in with your own Microsoft account to verify that you are an adult organizer in your Microsoft family group. We collect an alternate email address or phone number to boost account security. If your child needs help accessing their account, they will be able to use one of these alternates to validate they own the Microsoft account.

We collect limited information about children, including name, birthdate, email address, and region. When you sign your child up for an Xbox profile, they get a gamertag (a public nickname) and a unique identifier. When you create your child’s Xbox profile you consent to Microsoft collecting, using, and sharing information based on their privacy and communication settings on the Xbox online network. Your child’s privacy and communication settings are defaulted to the most restrictive.

Data we collect. We collect information about your child’s use of Xbox services, games, apps, and devices including:

  • When they sign in and sign out of Xbox, purchase history, and content they obtain.
  • Which games they play and apps they use, their game progress, achievements, play time per game, and other play statistics.
  • Performance data about Xbox consoles, Xbox Game Pass and other Xbox apps, the Xbox network, connected accessories, and network connection, including any software or hardware errors.
  • Content they add, upload, or share through the Xbox network, including text, pictures, and video they capture in games and apps.
  • Social activity, including chat data and interactions with other gamers, and connections they make (friends they add and people who follow them) on the Xbox network.

If your child uses an Xbox console or Xbox app on another device capable of accessing the Xbox network, and that device includes a storage device (hard drive or memory unit), usage data will be stored on the storage device and sent to Microsoft the next time they sign in to Xbox, even if they have been playing offline.

Xbox console diagnostic data. If your child uses an Xbox console, the console will send required data to Microsoft. Required data is the minimum data necessary to help keep Xbox safe, secure, up to date, and performing as expected.

Game captures. Any player in a multiplayer game session can record video (game clips) and capture screenshots of their view of the game play. Other players’ game clips and screenshots can capture your child’s in-game character and gamertag during that session. If a player captures game clips and screenshots on a PC, the resulting game clips might also capture audio chat if your child’s privacy and communication settings on the Xbox online network allow it.

Captioning. During Xbox real-time (“party”) chat, players may activate a voice-to-text feature that lets them view that chat as text. If a player activates this feature, Microsoft uses the resulting text data to provide captioning of chat for players who need it. This data may also be used to provide a safe gaming environment and enforce the Community Standards for Xbox.

Data use. Microsoft uses the data we collect to improve gaming products and experiences— making it safer and more fun over time. Data we collect also enables us to provide your child with personalized, curated experiences. This includes connecting them to games, content, services, and recommendations.

Xbox data viewable by others. When your child is using the Xbox network, their online presence (which can be set to “appear offline” or “blocked”), gamertag, game play statistics, and achievements are visible to other players on the network. Depending on how you set your child’s Xbox safety settings, they might share information when playing or communicating with others on the Xbox network.

In order to help make the Xbox network a safe gaming environment and enforce the Community Standards for Xbox, we may collect and review voice, text, images, videos and in-game content (such as game clips your child uploads, conversations they have, and things they post in clubs and games).

Xbox data shared with game and apps publishers. When your child uses an Xbox online game or any network-connected app on their Xbox console, PC, or mobile device, the publisher of that game or app has access to data about their usage to help the publisher deliver, support, and improve its product. This data may include: your child’s Xbox user identifier, gamertag, limited account info such as country and age range, data about your child’s in-game communications, any Xbox enforcement activity, game-play sessions (for example, moves made in-game or types of vehicles used in-game), your child’s presence on the Xbox network, the time they spend playing the game or app, rankings, statistics, gamer profiles, avatars, or gamerpics, friends lists, activity feeds for official clubs they belong to, official club memberships, and any content they create or submit in the game or app.

Third-party publishers and developers of games and apps have their own distinct and independent relationship with users and their collection and usage of personal data is subject to their specific privacy policies. You should carefully review their policies to determine how they use your child’s data. For example, publishers may choose to disclose or display game data (such as on leaderboards) through their own services. You may find their policies linked from the game or app detail pages in our stores.

Learn more at Data Sharing with Games and Apps.

To stop sharing game or app data with a publisher, remove its games or app from all devices where they have been installed. Some publisher access to your child’s data may be revoked at microsoft.com/consent.

Managing child settings. As the organizer of a Microsoft family group, you can manage a child’s information and settings on their Family Safety page, as well as their Xbox profile privacy settings from their Xbox Privacy & online safety page.

You can also use the Xbox Family Settings app to manage your child’s experience on the Xbox Network including: spending for Microsoft and Xbox stores, viewing your child’s Xbox activity, and setting age ratings and the amount of screen time.

Learn more about managing Xbox profiles at Xbox online safety and privacy settings.

Learn more about Microsoft family groups at Simplify your family’s life.

Accessing child data.  As the organizer of a Microsoft family group, a parent can view and delete a child’s data on their privacy dashboard. The dashboard allows you to review your child's personal information, have it deleted, and refuse to permit further collection or use of your child's information.

To close your child’s account, sign in with their account info at  account.microsoft.com/profile and select ”How to close your account.” 

Legacy.

  • Xbox 360. This Xbox console collects limited required diagnostic data. This data helps keep your child’s console functioning as expected.
  • Kinect. The Kinect sensor is a combination of camera, microphone, and infrared sensor that can enable motions and voice to be used to control game play. For example:
    • If you choose, the camera can be used to sign in to the Xbox network automatically using facial recognition. This data stays on the console, is not shared with anyone, and can be deleted at any time.
    • For game play, Kinect will map distances between the joints on your child’s body to create a stick figure representation to enable play.
    • The Kinect microphone can enable voice chat between players during play. The microphone also enables voice commands for control of the console, game, or app, or to enter search terms.
    • The Kinect sensor can also be used for audio and video communications through services such as Skype.

Learn more about Kinect at Xbox Kinect and Privacy.

Источник: https://privacy.microsoft.com/en-us/privacystatement

API Reference

accessibilityFeatures

Use the API to manage Chrome's accessibility features. This API relies on the ChromeSetting prototype of the type API for getting and setting individual accessibility features. In order to get feature states the extension must request permission. For modifying feature state, the extension needs permission. Note that does not imply permission.

action

Use the API to control the extension's icon in the Google Chrome toolbar.

alarms

Use the API to schedule code to run periodically or at a specified time in the future.

bookmarks

Use the API to create, organize, and otherwise manipulate bookmarks. Also see Override Pages, which you can use to create a custom Bookmark Manager page.

browserAction

Use browser actions to put icons in the main Google Chrome toolbar, to the right of the address bar. In addition to its icon, a browser action can have a tooltip, a badge, and a popup.

browsingData

Use the API to remove browsing data from a user's local profile.

certificateProvider

Use this API to expose certificates to the platform which can use these certificates for TLS authentications.

commands

Use the commands API to add keyboard shortcuts that trigger actions in your extension, for example, an action to open the browser action or send a command to the extension.

contentSettings

Use the API to change settings that control whether websites can use features such as cookies, JavaScript, and plugins. More generally speaking, content settings allow you to customize Chrome's behavior on a per-site basis instead of globally.

contextMenus

Use the API to add items to Google Chrome's context menu. You can choose what types of objects your context menu additions apply to, such as images, hyperlinks, and pages.

cookies

Use the API to query and modify cookies, and to be notified when they change.

debugger

The API serves as an alternate transport for Chrome's remote debugging protocol. Use to attach to one or more tabs to instrument network interaction, debug JavaScript, mutate the DOM and CSS, etc. Use the Debuggee to target tabs with sendCommand and route events by from onEvent callbacks.

declarativeContent

Use the API to take actions depending on the content of a page, without requiring permission to read the page's content.

declarativeNetRequest

The API is used to block or modify network requests by specifying declarative rules. This lets extensions modify network requests without intercepting them and viewing their content, thus providing more privacy.

desktopCapture

Desktop Capture API that can be used to capture content of screen, individual windows or tabs.

devtools.inspectedWindow

Use the API to interact with the inspected window: obtain the tab ID for the inspected page, evaluate the code in the context of the inspected window, reload the page, or obtain the list of resources within the page.

devtools.network

Use the API to retrieve the information about network requests displayed by the Developer Tools in the Network panel.

devtools.panels

Use the API to integrate your extension into Developer Tools window UI: create your own panels, access existing panels, and add sidebars.

documentScan

Use the API to discover and retrieve images from attached paper document scanners.

downloads

Use the API to programmatically initiate, monitor, manipulate, and search for downloads.

enterprise.deviceAttributes

Use the API to read device attributes. Note: This API is only available to extensions force-installed by enterprise policy.

enterprise.hardwarePlatform

Use the API to get the manufacturer and model of the hardware platform where the browser runs. Note: This API is only available to extensions installed by enterprise policy.

enterprise.networkingAttributes

Use the API to read information about your current network. Note: This API is only available to extensions force-installed by enterprise policy.

enterprise.platformKeys

Use the API to generate keys and install certificates for these keys. The certificates will be managed by the platform and can be used for TLS authentication, network access or by other extension through {@link platformKeys chrome.platformKeys}.

events

The namespace contains common types used by APIs dispatching events to notify you when something interesting happens.

extension

The API has utilities that can be used by any extension page. It includes support for exchanging messages between an extension and its content scripts or between extensions, as described in detail in Message Passing.

extensionTypes

The API contains type declarations for Chrome extensions.

fileBrowserHandler

Use the API to extend the Chrome OS file browser. For example, you can use this API to enable users to upload files to your website.

fileSystemProvider

Use the API to create file systems, that can be accessible from the file manager on Chrome OS.

fontSettings

Use the API to manage Chrome's font settings.

gcm

Use to enable apps and extensions to send and receive messages through the Google Cloud Messaging Service.

history

Use the API to interact with the browser's record of visited pages. You can add, remove, and query for URLs in the browser's history. To override the history page with your own version, see Override Pages.

i18n

Use the infrastructure to implement internationalization across your whole app or extension.

identity

Use the API to get OAuth2 access tokens.

idle

Use the API to detect when the machine's idle state changes.

input.ime

Use the API to implement a custom IME for Chrome OS. This allows your extension to handle keystrokes, set the composition, and manage the candidate window.

instanceID

Use to access the Instance ID service.

loginState

Use the API to read and monitor the login state.

management

The API provides ways to manage the list of extensions/apps that are installed and running. It is particularly useful for extensions that override the built-in New Tab page.

notifications

Use the API to create rich notifications using templates and show these notifications to users in the system tray.

omnibox

The omnibox API allows you to register a keyword with Google Chrome's address bar, which is also known as the omnibox.

pageAction

Use the API to put icons in the main Google Chrome toolbar, to the right of the address bar. Page actions represent actions that can be taken on the current page, but that aren't applicable to all pages. Page actions appear grayed out when inactive.

pageCapture

Use the API to save a tab as MHTML.

permissions

Use the API to request declared optional permissions at run time rather than install time, so users understand why the permissions are needed and grant only those that are necessary.

platformKeys

Use the API to access client certificates managed by the platform. If the user or policy grants the permission, an extension can use such a certficate in its custom authentication protocol. E.g. this allows usage of platform managed certificates in third party VPNs (see {@link vpnProvider chrome.vpnProvider}).

power

Use the API to override the system's power management features.

printerProvider

The API exposes events used by print manager to query printers controlled by extensions, to query their capabilities and to submit print jobs to these printers.

printing

Use the API to send print jobs to printers installed on Chromebook.

printingMetrics

Use the API to fetch data about printing usage.

privacy

Use the API to control usage of the features in Chrome that can affect a user's privacy. This API relies on the ChromeSetting prototype of the type API for getting and setting Chrome's configuration.

proxy

Use the API to manage Chrome's proxy settings. This API relies on the ChromeSetting prototype of the type API for getting and setting the proxy configuration.

runtime

Use the API to retrieve the background page, return details about the manifest, and listen for and respond to events in the app or extension lifecycle. You can also use this API to convert the relative path of URLs to fully-qualified URLs.

scripting

Use the API to execute script in different contexts.

search

Use the API to search via the default provider.

sessions

Use the API to query and restore tabs and windows from a browsing session.

storage

Use the API to store, retrieve, and track changes to user data.

system.cpu

Use the API to query CPU metadata.

system.display

Use the API to query display metadata.

system.memory

The API.

system.storage

Use the API to query storage device information and be notified when a removable storage device is attached and detached.

tabCapture

Use the API to interact with tab media streams.

tabGroups

Use the API to interact with the browser's tab grouping system. You can use this API to modify and rearrange tab groups in the browser. To group and ungroup tabs, or to query what tabs are in groups, use the API.

tabs

Use the API to interact with the browser's tab system. You can use this API to create, modify, and rearrange tabs in the browser.

topSites

Use the API to access the top sites (i.e. most visited sites) that are displayed on the new tab page. These do not include shortcuts customized by the user.

tts

Use the API to play synthesized text-to-speech (TTS). See also the related {@link ttsEngine} API, which allows an extension to implement a speech engine.

ttsEngine

Use the API to implement a text-to-speech(TTS) engine using an extension. If your extension registers using this API, it will receive events containing an utterance to be spoken and other parameters when any extension or Chrome App uses the {@link tts} API to generate speech. Your extension can then use any available web technology to synthesize and output the speech, and send events back to the calling function to report the status.

types

The API contains type declarations for Chrome.

vpnProvider

Use the API to implement a VPN client.

wallpaper

Use the API to change the ChromeOS wallpaper.

webNavigation

Use the API to receive notifications about the status of navigation requests in-flight.

webRequest

Use the API to observe and analyze traffic and to intercept, block, or modify requests in-flight.

windows

Use the API to interact with browser windows. You can use this API to create, modify, and rearrange windows in the browser.

Источник: https://developer.chrome.com/docs/extensions/reference/

Google 2-Step Verification Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

2-Step Verification Basics

Why should I set up 2-Step Verification?

You should set up 2-step verification because doing so makes it very hard for anyone to take over your email account remotely. Without setting up 2-step verification, hackers could get into your account if they figured out your password. With 2-step verification enabled, they would need the password and physical control of your phone, your wallet or purse, or your actual computer. Here's why this matters: In most cases you would have no way of knowing whether someone somewhere else in the world had cracked your password and was rummaging through your account. This lets you know.

How do I turn on 2-Step Verification?

When you enable 2-Step Verification (also known as two-factor authentication), you add an extra layer of security to your account. You sign in with something you know (your password) and something you have (like a code sent to your phone).

To set up 2-Step Verification:

  • Go to the 2-Step Verification page. You will be prompted to sign in to your WFU Google Account.
  • Click Get started. (Have a phone nearby.)
  • Follow the quick step-by-step setup process.

Once you're finished, you'll be taken to the 2-Step Verification settings page. Review your settings and add backup phone numbers. The next time you sign in, you'll receive a message with a verification code. You also have the option of using a Security Key for 2-Step Verification or a variety of other alternative second steps. We recommend you choose at least one alternative option.

How do I sign in with 2-Step Verification?

Signing in with 2-Step Verification is easy.

  • Go to the sign-in page of your mail or any other Wake Forest application that employs Google Single Sign-On, and enter your username and password like you normally do.
  • Every 30 days or every time you try logging into your WFU Google Mail or any Google Single Sign On service on a new device, you’ll be asked for a six-digit code, which you'll get from your phone. If you want, when you enter your code, you can choose to trust your computer -- this means you won't be asked for a code again when you sign in from this computer. If you sign in from another computer, however, you’ll be asked for a code.
  • After you turn on 2-Step Verification, non-browser applications and devices that use your Google Account (such as Outlook), may be unable to connect to your account. However, in a few steps, you can generate a special password called application-specific password to allow this application to connect to your account -- and don't worry, you'll only have to do this once for each device or application.

Alternate Methods

What if I don’t want to use my phone?


Don’t want to use your phone? No problem. You’ll need a phone to set up 2-Step Verification at first, but you can then immediately change your second step. Here are some alternatives:

What is a security key? How do I use it?

A security key (also called a fob, or USB key), is a Fido U2F certified, read-only device that looks like a USB flash drive. When plugged in to your USB drive, it will generate a code for you, instead of you entering a code manually. Any device that is Fido U2F certified can be used with Google 2-Step Verification. Click here for more information on the IS-preferred security key, YubiKey.

Are there limitations with security keys?

Yes, there are a few limitations to U2F security keys. They are:

  • You must be using a device with a USB port, and the USB port must not be disabled (some kiosks and computer labs disable USB ports for security reasons).
  • You must be using a supported browser.
  • Google Chrome supports U2F natively.
  • While Firefox does not natively support U2F, there are extensions that may add U2F functionality.

Can I use Google Voice to receive codes?

Using Google Voice is not recommended. If you use Google Voice to receive verification codes, you can easily create a situation where you’ve locked yourself out of your account. For example, if you are signed out of your Google Voice app, you might need a verification code to get back in. However, you won’t be able to receive this verification code because it will be sent to your Google Voice, which you can’t access.

Troubleshooting

What if my phone was lost or stolen?

If your phone was lost or stolen, we strongly recommend that you change your WFU Google Account password andrevoke your App Passwords. This will help prevent others from accessing your WFU Google Account from your phone. Learn more here.

What if I get a new phone after I’ve set up Google 2-Step Verification?

No problem. Follow these instructions.

My Google Authenticator codes aren’t working (Android). What do I do?

This might be because the time on your Google Authenticator app is not synced correctly. To make sure that you have the correct time:

  1.     Go to the main menu on the Google Authenticator app
  2.     Tap More Settings
  3.     Tap Time correction for codes
  4.     Tap Sync Now

On the next screen, the app will confirm that the time has been synced, and you should now be able to use your verification codes to sign in. The sync will only affect the internal time of your Google Authenticator app, and will not change your device’s Date & Time settings.

I’m stuck and I need backup codes! Help!

If none of your 2-Step options are working, you can call the Information Systems Service DeskMonday through Friday, from 8am to 5pm at 336-758-4357, or email us at help@wfu.edu, or visit us at The Bridge located on the main floor of the Z. Smith Reynolds Library, and we’ll provide you with a backup code. Please note, you will be required to answer security questions in order for us to provide you with this information.

What do I do if I’ve lost my backup codes, and want to revoke them?

If you lost the print-out of your backup codes, you can revoke them on yoursettings page. In the Backup codes section click Show codes, then click Get new codes. This will invalidate the previous set of backup codes and generate a new set.

I turned on 2-Step Verification and an app on my phone or computer stopped working. What now?

When you turn on 2-Step Verification, any apps that need access to your WFU Google Account will stop working until youenter an App Password in place of your normal password. Common applications and devices that require an App Password include:

  • Old versions of email clients such as Outlook, Apple Mail and Thunderbird
  • The email app that comes with your phone (but is not made by Google)
  • Some chat, contacts and YouTube clients

Note: If you're running the latest operating system on your iPhone/iPad or Mac computer, you will no longer have to use App passwords to use 2-Step Verification. You do not need to memorize App Passwords because every App Password is only used once. You can generate a new App Password whenever you’re asked for one--even for a device or application you’ve authorized before.

Why does Google ask for verification every time I log in, even though I checked the box to ask every 30 days?

You most likely need to enable cookies in your browser, or your browser is set to automatically clear it's cache on exit.


Was this answer helpful? Yes No

Sorry we couldn't be helpful. Help us improve this article with your feedback.

Источник: https://help.wfu.edu/support/solutions/articles/13000010313-google-2-step-verification-frequently-asked-questions-faq-

API Reference

accessibilityFeatures

Use the API to manage Chrome's accessibility features. This API relies on the ChromeSetting prototype of the type API for getting and setting individual accessibility features. In order to get feature states the extension must request permission. For modifying feature state, the extension needs permission. Note that does not imply permission.

action

Use the API to control the extension's icon in the Google Chrome toolbar.

alarms

Use the API to schedule code to run periodically or at a specified time in the future.

bookmarks

Use the API to create, organize, and otherwise manipulate bookmarks. Also see Override Pages, which you can use to create a custom Bookmark Manager page.

browserAction

Use browser actions to put icons in the main Google Chrome toolbar, to the right of the address bar. In addition to its icon, a browser action can have a tooltip, a badge, and a popup.

browsingData

Use the API to remove browsing data from a user's local profile.

certificateProvider

Use this API to expose certificates to the platform which can use these certificates for TLS authentications.

commands

Use the commands API to add keyboard shortcuts that trigger actions in your extension, for example, an action to open the browser action or send a command to the extension.

contentSettings

Use the API to change settings that control whether websites can use features such as cookies, JavaScript, and plugins. More generally speaking, content settings allow you to customize Chrome's behavior on a per-site basis instead of globally.

contextMenus

Use the API to add items to Google Chrome's context menu. You can choose what types of objects your context menu additions apply to, such as images, hyperlinks, and pages.

cookies

Use the API to query and modify cookies, and to be notified when they change.

debugger

The API serves as an alternate transport for Chrome's remote debugging protocol. Use to attach to one or more tabs to instrument network interaction, debug JavaScript, mutate the DOM and CSS, etc. Use the Debuggee to target tabs with sendCommand and route events by from google chrome account - Crack Key For U callbacks.

declarativeContent

Use the API to take actions depending on the content of a page, without requiring permission to read the page's content.

declarativeNetRequest

The API is used to block or modify network requests by specifying declarative rules. This lets extensions modify network requests without intercepting them and viewing their content, thus providing more privacy.

desktopCapture

Desktop Capture API that can be used to photo.to editor content of screen, individual windows or tabs.

devtools.inspectedWindow

Use the API to interact with the inspected window: obtain the tab ID for the inspected page, evaluate the code in foobar download - Crack Key For U context of the inspected window, reload the page, or obtain the list of resources within the page.

devtools.network

Use the API to retrieve the information about network requests displayed by the Developer Tools in the Network panel.

devtools.panels

Use the API to integrate your extension into Developer Tools window UI: create your own panels, access existing panels, and add sidebars.

documentScan

Use the API to google chrome account - Crack Key For U and retrieve images from attached paper document scanners.

downloads

Use the API to programmatically initiate, monitor, manipulate, and search for downloads.

enterprise.deviceAttributes

Use the API to read device attributes. Note: This API is only available to extensions force-installed by enterprise policy.

enterprise.hardwarePlatform

Use the API to get the manufacturer and model of the hardware platform where the browser runs. Note: This API is only available to extensions installed by enterprise policy.

enterprise.networkingAttributes

Use the API to read information about your current network. Note: This API is only available to extensions force-installed google chrome account - Crack Key For U enterprise policy.

enterprise.platformKeys

Use the API to generate keys and install certificates for these keys. The certificates will be managed by the platform and can be used for TLS authentication, network access or by other extension through {@link platformKeys chrome.platformKeys}.

events

The namespace contains common types used by APIs dispatching events to notify you when something interesting happens.

extension

The API has utilities that can be viewcompanion premium - Free Activators by any extension page. It includes support for exchanging messages between an extension and its content scripts or between extensions, as described in detail in Message Passing.

extensionTypes

The API contains type declarations for Chrome extensions.

fileBrowserHandler

Use the API to extend the Chrome OS file browser. For example, you can use this API to enable users to upload files to your website.

fileSystemProvider

Use the API to create file systems, that can be accessible from the file manager on Chrome OS.

fontSettings

Use the API to manage Chrome's font settings.

gcm

Use to enable apps and extensions to send and receive messages through the Google Cloud Messaging Service.

history

Use the API to interact with the browser's record of visited pages. You can add, remove, and query for URLs in the browser's history. To override the history page with your own version, see Override Pages.

i18n

Use the infrastructure to implement internationalization across your whole app or extension.

identity

Use the API to get OAuth2 access tokens.

idle

Use the API to detect when the machine's idle state changes.

input.ime

Use the API to implement a custom IME for Chrome OS. This allows your extension to handle keystrokes, set the composition, and manage the candidate window.

instanceID

Use to access the Instance ID service.

loginState

Use the API to read and monitor the login state.

management

The API provides ways to manage the list of extensions/apps that are installed and running. It is particularly useful for extensions that override the built-in New Tab page.

notifications

Use the API to create rich notifications using templates and show these notifications to users in the system tray.

omnibox

The omnibox API allows you to register a keyword with Google Chrome's address bar, which is also known as the omnibox.

pageAction

Use the API to put icons in the main Google Chrome toolbar, to the right of the address bar. Page actions represent actions that can be taken on the current page, but that aren't applicable to all pages. Page actions appear grayed out when inactive.

pageCapture

Use the API to save a tab as MHTML.

permissions

Use the API to request declared optional permissions at run time rather than install time, so users understand why the permissions are needed and grant only those that are necessary.

platformKeys

Use the API to access client certificates managed by the platform. If the user or policy grants the permission, an extension can use such a certficate in its custom authentication protocol. E.g. this allows usage of platform managed certificates in third party VPNs (see {@link vpnProvider chrome.vpnProvider}).

power

Use the API to override the system's power management features.

printerProvider

The API exposes events used by print manager to query printers controlled by extensions, to query their capabilities and to submit print jobs to these printers.

printing

Use the API to send print jobs to printers installed on Chromebook.

printingMetrics

Use the API to fetch data about printing usage.

privacy

Use the API to control usage of the features in Chrome that can affect a user's privacy. This API relies on the ChromeSetting prototype of the type API for getting and setting Chrome's configuration.

proxy

Use the API to manage Chrome's proxy settings. This API relies on the ChromeSetting prototype of the type API for getting and setting the proxy configuration.

runtime

Use the API to retrieve the background page, return details about the manifest, and listen for and respond to events in the app or extension lifecycle. You can also use this API to convert the relative path of URLs to fully-qualified URLs.

scripting

Use the API to execute script in different contexts.

search

Use the API to search via the default provider.

sessions

Use the API to query and restore tabs and windows from a browsing session.

storage

Use the API to store, retrieve, and track changes to user data.

system.cpu

Use the API to query CPU metadata.

system.display

Use the API to query display metadata.

system.memory

The API.

system.storage

Use the API to query storage device information and be notified when a removable storage device is attached and detached.

tabCapture

Use the API to interact with tab media streams.

tabGroups

Use the API to interact with the browser's tab grouping system. You can use this API to modify and rearrange tab groups in the browser. To group and ungroup tabs, or to query what tabs are in groups, use the API.

tabs

Use the API to interact with the browser's tab system. You can use this API to create, modify, and rearrange tabs in the browser.

topSites

Use the API to access the top sites (i.e. most visited sites) that are displayed on the new tab page. These do not include shortcuts customized by the user.

tts

Use the API to play synthesized text-to-speech (TTS). See also the related {@link ttsEngine} API, which allows an extension to implement a speech engine.

ttsEngine

Use the API to implement a text-to-speech(TTS) engine using an extension. If your extension registers using this API, it will receive events containing an utterance to be spoken and other parameters when any extension or Chrome App mailbirdramon - Crack Key For U the {@link tts} API to generate speech. Your extension can then use any available web technology to synthesize and output the speech, and send events back to the calling function to report the status.

types

The API contains type declarations for Chrome.

vpnProvider

Use the API to implement a VPN client.

wallpaper

Use the API to change the ChromeOS wallpaper.

webNavigation

Use the API to receive notifications about the status of navigation requests in-flight.

webRequest

Use the API to observe and analyze traffic and to intercept, block, or modify requests in-flight.

windows

Use the API to interact with browser windows. You can use this API to create, modify, and rearrange windows in the browser.

Источник: https://developer.chrome.com/docs/extensions/reference/

It began with dumplings.

When I got an email at midnight last March from Grubhub notifying me that my order from Dumpling Depot was on its way to an address 3,000 miles away from my location in New York City, I thought there must have been some mistake. And there was: mine.

Because I didn’t take a few basic internet security precautions, hackers robbed me of $13,103.91 worth of cash and prizes from three of my accounts over the next six months. And while this doesn’t make me, your Recode data privacy reporter, look very smart, I’m sharing my story with you in the hope that it will help you avoid a similar fate.

The person who hacked my Grubhub account last March ordered a black fungus salad with celery, a five-spice-marinated beef entree, and 12 pork dumplings (with chives) for a total of $26.84. At first, it was annoying but didn’t seem like that big of a deal: I notified Grubhub about the fraudulent charge and got a refund. Then I changed my Windows 7 Professional Product key Generator, sent an angry text to the phone number on the food order, and went about my life, foolishly thinking that this was an isolated incident. It was not.

Five months later, I logged into my bank account to find a substantially smaller number in my savings account than I expected. Sure enough, $9,000 had been wired away two days previously. During the subsequent, frantic call to my bank, I looked at my checking account and saw that $4,000 had been wired away from there, too — a discovery I declared with a variety of curse words. The woman on the other end of the line had a pleasant Southern drawl, which made her promises that I would get the money back seem extra reassuring.

She was right, although my access to all of my money was cut off for several days as the bank froze my old, violated accounts and created new ones. It took about two weeks before everything was fully up and running again and my $13,000 was restored. I don’t know if my bank got the $13,000 back or PE Explorer Activation key fronted me the money and called it a loss. When I called them for an update and to demand justice, they told me they couldn’t tell me any details about the case because I was not the victim, the bank was. Obviously, things could have been a lot worse: I did get the money back.

But it wasn’t over. A month later, in September, I received an email from my credit card company informing me that it declined a $323.01 charge that Caviar tried to put on an expired card. Having a pretty good idea of where this was going, I checked my credit card and found that while the $323.01 charge was declined, two charges of $1.64 and $75.43 from Caviar had gone through. For some reason, my card transferred some (but not all) purchases made on the expired card that was attached to my account to my current one. And someone got away with $77.07 of rustic street food from one of Eater San Francisco’s top Oakland Vietnamese restaurant picks. Fortunately for me, the money was refunded to my credit card.

But just because I was lucky enough to get my money back in full, it doesn’t mean you will if hackers ever target you. And even losing that money temporarily was still a big, scary inconvenience: I had bills to pay and no way to pay them. I was terrified I would lose my health insurance coverage. I also had a few bill pay services linked to a closed account I didn’t switch over in time, and now I’m on some kind of scofflaw list at E-ZPass.

I don’t know if my bank, Grubhub, or Caviar were able to get any of the stolen money back. If not, they (and all the other businesses that cover hacked account expenditures) need to make it back somehow — and usually, customers end up having to cover those costs in some way. That means those thousands of dollars will come out of my pocket in one form or another. It will also come out of yours. Sorry about that.

I’m pretty sure I know how this happened, so I’m happy (and embarrassed) to share it with you so you’ll have better internet security hygiene than I did. Here are the three things I screwed up so you don’t google chrome account - Crack Key For U to:

1) Don’t reuse your passwords. And definitely don’t do it on dozens of different accounts.

Yes, I used the same password (or a variant of it) for most of my accounts, and I used it for almost a decade. I thought I had thwarted hackers by substituting certain letters and numbers for similar-looking special characters, but obviously they saw through this clever ruse.

This was probably my original sin. Somewhere, sometime, one of my online accounts got hacked, and my username, email address, password, and who knows what else was put on the internet for anyone to see and exploit. And once a hacker got my password, all they had to do was plug it (and its variants) into as many sites as possible until something clicked. The mini crime spree across multiple sites in the space of six months indicates that that’s exactly what they did.

Perhaps you, like me, re-use passwords — actually, half of you reading this do, according to this recent survey. If so, here’s what you should do: Check a site called Have I Been Pwned? to see if your information has been compromised. When I did, I saw that my email address is listed in no fewer than 15 different site breaches. I had assumed that every site where I’d created an account had taken adequate measures to keep my information secure and private, but my trust was sorely misplaced.

Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

What I should have done — and what Google chrome account - Crack Key For U do now, and what you should do if you don’t already — is use different passwords for everything. This isn’t as complicated as you might think. I have a password manager app that keeps all of my usernames and passwords in one place (I use LastPass, but there are several such services — some free, some not — out there). Now, if my password for one site gets out there, the damage is limited to that site anymp4 blu-ray ripper review. They’re pretty easy to use, and many of them have password generators to help you come up with unique, difficult-to-crack passwords for every account.

Yes, there’s always a possibility — albeit remote — that the password manager itself could get hacked. Security consulting firm Independent Security Evaluators found vulnerabilities in several password manager apps but still said password managers were “a good thing.” LastPass claims that it has only had one “security incident” in its 10-year history, and that its users’ passwords were not exposed. 1Password says it has never been hacked.

When it comes to password managers, at least I know I’ve entrusted my information to a place that promises it’s taken all available security precautions. I don’t think I can say the same for Disqus, LinkedIn, MyHeritage, or Tumblr, all of which were listed on Have I Been Pwned? as having data breaches that could have exposed my password.

If downloading and setting up an entire app to manage your password seems a little beyond your capabilities (or the amount of work you want to put in), many browsers and devices will now do this for you, even if these options are less secure. Mac devices have a keychain app; Google has its own password manager you can use with its Chrome browser; and Firefox has a password manager too. You know when you set up an account for the first time on a website and a prompt comes up on your browser or the device itself asking if you want to save your password for the site? That’s it.

If even that seems too difficult or tech-y for you, you can always go analog and write your passwords down in a notebook. There are different schools of thought out there on this: Some say it’s the best defense against hackers you can get and others say you should never, ever write your password down. Considering that most Americans keep track of their passwords by memorizing them (which indicates they’re only using one or few passwords for multiple sites, given the limitations of the human memory) or writing them down, I do think you’re better served by having unique passwords for every site written in a book (presumably one that you’ve stored in a safe location to which there is limited outside access) than you are using the same password all over the internet. Just keep in mind the disastrous consequences if that book were to ever fall into the wrong hands.

Another good thing about having your passwords in a central place? It’ll help you keep track of all the accounts you have. After the bank hack, I changed my password on every account I could think of. But I forgot about Caviar, which I bandicam serial number one time in 2018 because it was the only delivery service for the good cheeseburger place near me. So it was still there for the taking when my hacker got a craving for green papaya salad and braised pork belly.

Finally, change your passwords every once in a while. Recommendations for how often you should do it vary, but if you are like me, it’s time to realize that changing passwords once a decade is not frequent enough. How about once a year? February 1 is the (unofficial) Change Your Password Day. That’s coming up soon.

2) Put two-factor authentication on everything

Two-factor authentication, or 2FA (also known as two-step verification), means you need two ways of verifying your identity before you can log into an account, which helps protect you from hacks. One factor is your password. The other can come from an authentication service or via a text message. This way, a hacker might google chrome account - Crack Key For U your password, but if they don’t have access to your phone or the authenticator app, they can’t get into your account.

My bank didn’t offer 2FA by text — the method I was the most familiar with — but only through an authenticator called Symantec VIP. That involved downloading and setting up an app on my phone, which I took one look at, got suspicious that someone was trying to sell me something and make me put yet another unwanted app on my phone, and decided not to bother with. In retrospect, I really should have bothered! So should you. Authentication services are an increasingly common option because they are the most secure 2FA method, even if they take a few extra steps to set up (basically, downloading and installing the app in the first place). I use Google Authenticator, but there are several others.

Another method is via text, where you just tell the website your phone number and it sends you a text with a PIN code when you log in. This is easier, but it’s also less secure: A really determined hacker can get access to your text messages by hacking your SIM card. To give yourself an added measure of security against that, you can put a custom PIN code on your SIM card with your cellphone provider.

My bank does offer 2FA by text now, and I have it set up. But a lot of people don’t use 2FA at all. A 2017 survey showed that only 28 percent of Americans use it, while more than half of them had never heard of it. And a Google engineer said in 2018 that more than 90 percent of active Google accounts don’t use 2FA. Meanwhile, Google’s research has shown that 2FA blocks the vast majority of hacking attempts. Remember, this isn’t just about locking down your bank account: You can lose access to your Facebook profile, or have your Abelssoft AntiRansomware v21.92 Serial Key account taken over by porn bots. If 2FA is google chrome account - Crack Key For U on a site you use, take advantage of it.

If the reason why you haven’t set up 2FA yet is that you think it’s google chrome account - Crack Key For U complicated, I strongly urge you to at least give it a try. Most sites have detailed, easy-to-follow instructions on how to set it up (usually found in the settings “security” section — here’s Facebook’s, for example), it’s only a few steps, and then it’s just a matter of getting a text or opening an authenticator app on your phone to get into your account. And if you save your login for future use, you only have to do it once.

3) Don’t save your credit card info on your account

The reason why the hackers were able to buy food on my credit card was because I saved my credit card info on those food delivery accounts. Lots of vendors you have accounts with will give you that “save this card for later” option, and I suggest that you not do this.

This is not always possible — Uber, for example, requires you to have a credit card attached to your account at all times. But where you can avoid saving your card on your account, you absolutely should. Yes, you will have to enter your credit card info every time you place an order or make a purchase, but that’s less of a pain than sending a series of increasingly panicked emails to various delivery services and calling your credit card company in the middle of the night.

In the end, none of these methods are foolproof and this list is not exhaustive, but they are a great place to start. And trust me, it’s better than the alternative. Do as I say, not as I did, and the next time a hacker gets a hankering for pork dumplings (with chives), you won’t be the one footing the bill.

Open Sourced is made possible by Omidyar Network. All Open Sourced content is editorially independent and produced by our journalists.

Источник: https://www.vox.com/recode/2020/1/28/21080122/avoid-hack-hacker-theft

Developer Mode

Warning: This document is old & has moved. Please update any links:
https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromiumos/docs/+/HEAD/developer_mode.md

Production Chrome OS devices that are shipped from the factory are locked down and will not let you make changes to the software. This page describes how to enable developer mode and get root access to your system.

Enable Developer Mode

Modern Chrome OS devices can be put into developer mode by pressing specific keys while Chrome OS is booting:

Caution: Modifications you make to the system freemake music downloader - Activators Patch not supported by Google, may cause hardware, software or security issues and may void warranty.

NOTE: Putting your device into developer mode inherently makes it a little less secure. Specifically, it makes the “verified boot” that's built-in to your hardware a little bit more lax, allowing your hardware to run custom (non-Google-signed) images. It also gives you access to a “root” shell.

If you’re encountering issues putting your device into Developer Mode, it's possible that your device administrator has blocked Developer Mode access on your device. Please follow the link to read more details about blocked Developer Mode.

You can tell that you're in Developer Mode if you see one of these screens when you turn the device on:

developer mode 1developer mode 2developer mode 3developer mode 4

Switch to Normal Mode

To restore your device to Normal Mode (i.e., disable Developer Mode), reboot your device and perform the following action:

  • Device with keyboard: Press the at the firmware screen.
  • Devices without keyboard (tablet): Use the and keys to select the option. Press the button to confirm.

NOTE: If you‘ve made changes to the rootfs filesystem while in developer mode, you may have to use the recovery process to restore your device to its factory condition. However, as long as you don’t crack open the case, you shouldn‘t be able to do anything that can’t be undone by recovery (software).

Getting to a Command Prompt

If you‘re a Linux hacker, you probably know that Google Chrome OS is built on top of Linux and you’re wondering how you can jailbreak your device so you can get to a command prompt. It turns out: there's no need. The command prompt is built in to your device!

NOTE: Before following these instructions, remember to put your device into Developer Mode.

Get the Command Prompt Through VT-2

One way to get the login prompt is through something calledor “virtual terminal 2&rdquo. If you're a Linux user, this is probably familiar. You can get to by pressing:

[ Ctrl ] [ Alt ] [ → ]

where the key is the right-arrow key just above the number on your keyboard.

Once you have the login prompt, you should see a set of instructions telling you about command-line access. By default, you can login as the user with no password. This includes the ability to do password-less. The instructions on the screen will tell you how you can set a google chrome account - Crack Key For U. They also tell you how to disable screen dimming.

In order to get back to the browser press:

[ Ctrl ] [ Alt ] [ ← ]

where the key is the left-arrow key just above the number on your keyboard.

NOTE: The top-rows of the keyboard google chrome account - Crack Key For U a Chrome OS device are actually treated by Linux as the keys through. Thus, the key is actually and the key is actually .

NOTE: Kernel messages show up on .

Getting the Command Prompt Through “crosh”

An alternate way to get to a terminal prompt is to use []:

  1. Go through the standard Chrome OS login screen (you‘ll need to setup a network, etc) and get to the web browser. It’s OK if you login as guest.
  2. Press to get the [] shell.
  3. Use the shell command to get the shell prompt. NOTE: even if you set a password for the chronos user, you won't need it here (though you still need it for sudo access)

NOTE: Entering the shell this way doesn't give you all the instructions that does (like how to set your password). You might want to follow the steps once just to get the instructions.

If you want to get back to the browser without killing the shell, you can use .

NOTE: You can create as many shells as you want with again and another shell will be opened. You can between them.

Making Changes to the Filesystem

The Chromium OS rootfs is mounted read-only. In developer mode you can disable the rootfs verification, enabling it to be modified.

NOTE: If you mount the root filesystem in writeable mode, even if you make no changes, it will no longer be verifiable and you'll have to use a recovery image to restore your system when you switch back to normal mode. Auto updates may also fail until a full payload is downloaded.

To make your rootfs writable, run the following command from a shell on the device:

(dut) $ sudo /usr/share/vboot/bin/make_dev_ssd.sh --remove_rootfs_verification

Then reboot. Your rootfs will be mounted read/write.

Specifying Command Line Flags for Chrome

Booting from USB or SD card

Chromium OS can be installed on a USB stick or SD card, for example if you build it yourself. In order to boot these, you have to first enable booting from external storage by opening a shell and running the command. (Even though this only says USB, it will also work for SD cards.)

Afterwards, reboot the device and use the method appropriate for your device to trigger external storage boot when you see the developer mode boot screen.

Running an alternative bootloader (“legacy BIOS”)

You can install an alternative bootloader that may make it easier to boot other operating systems. This does not require you to disable firmware write protection (with its associated risks).

NOTE: Some Chrome OS devices may ship with one or more alternative bootloaders pre-installed. These are merely provided as examples of how to set up the alternative bootloader feature. They are not officially supported, usually not tested and may or may not work at all or do anything useful. The point of the alternative bootloader feature is just to allow users to install their own -- we may occasionally pre-install software if it is readily available, but we are not committing to test and maintain it or to provide the same set across all platforms.

You can also find ready-made alternative bootloaders to install on third-party community sites such as mrchromebox.tech. Note that these sites are not affiliated with Google or the Chromium OS project and we are not responsible for any issues or damages arising from them. Use at your own risk.

Alternative bootloaders must be packaged as a coreboot payload and installed in the section of the firmware flash. You can read out the flash and print the contents of this section by opening a shell and running

flashrom -r /tmp/bios.bin cbfstool /tmp/bios.bin print -r RW_LEGACY

If you see a file called in this output, you have a 2019+ platform that supports having more than one alternative bootloader installed at the same time. Otherwise, you can only install a single bootloader that must be called. In that case you may need to remove an already installed bootloader via to make room.

The new bootloader you want to add should be formatted as an ELF file. Make sure that the entry point information in the file is correctly set and that it contains code able to run in a firmware environment (i.e. no operating system support, nothing set up other than what coreboot usually provides to its payloads). Then add the file via

cbfstool /tmp/bios.bin add-payload -r RW_LEGACY -c lzma -n <your bootloader name> -f <path/to/your/bootloader.elf>

On an older platform make sure the name is and you're done. On a newer platform, you can choose any name you want but you need to enter it in the bootloader directory file. Extract this file with

cbfstool /tmp/bios.bin extract -r RW_LEGACY -n altfw/list -f /tmp/altfw.txt

and edit with a normal text editor (e.g. ). The file contains one line per bootloader with the following values separated by semicolons:

  1. Number of the bootloader in the developer mode menu (0 through 9)
    • NOTE: The bootloader number 0 is always the “default” that will boot if is set and the developer boot screen timer runs out.
  2. Name of the bootloader in CBFS (i.e. the parameter to )
  3. Name of the bootloader that shall appear in the developer mode menu
  4. Comment field for more detailed description (not used by firmware)

Add a line for the bootloader you just added, save the file, then replace the file in CBFS with the updated version via

cbfstool /tmp/bios.bin remove -r RW_LEGACY -n altfw/list cbfstool /tmp/bios.bin add -r RW_LEGACY -n altfw/list -f /tmp/altfw.txt -t raw

You may also want to delete the file, if present. This will prevent future Chrome OS system updates from overwriting the alternative bootloader section after you modified it:

cbfstool /tmp/bios.bin remove -r RW_LEGACY -n cros_allow_auto_update

Finally, you must write the modified CBFS section back to the firmware flash and tell the firmware to enable the alternative bootloader feature:

flashrom -w /tmp/bios.bin -i RW_LEGACY crossystem dev_boot_legacy=1

Now you can reboot and use the method appropriate for your device to run your alternative bootloader when you see the developer mode boot screen.

Источник: https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromiumos/docs/+/master/developer_mode.md
Data Management
  • https://tech.hindustantimes.com/tech/news/how-to-know-if-password-was-hacked-know-via-google-chrome-password-checker-71637330474065.html

    How to know if password was .

  • https://tech.hindustantimes.com/tech/news/amazon-black-friday-sale-2021-get-fire-tablets-with-big-price-cuts-in-uk-71637327575945.html

    Amazon Black Friday Sale 2021: Get .

  • https://tech.hindustantimes.com/tech/news/go-fashion-ipo-share-allotment-status-investors-can-check-online-on-this-date-71637320135337.html

    Go Fashion IPO share allotment .

  • https://tech.hindustantimes.com/tech/news/your-telegram-is-set-to-change-sponsored-messages-are-coming-71637308822711.html

    Your Telegram is set to change! .

  • Источник: https://tech.hindustantimes.com/tech/news/how-to-know-if-password-was-hacked-know-via-google-chrome-password-checker-71637330474065.html
    google chrome account  - Crack Key For U

    watch the thematic video

    How to Activate IDM for Lifetime for Free- 2020 -- Fake Serial Number Problem

    Notice: Undefined variable: z_bot in /sites/travelafter.us/crack-key-for/google-chrome-account-crack-key-for-u.php on line 109

    Notice: Undefined variable: z_empty in /sites/travelafter.us/crack-key-for/google-chrome-account-crack-key-for-u.php on line 109

    Posted inCrack Key For

    4 thoughts on “Google chrome account - Crack Key For U”

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *